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E-mail invitations to general practitioners were as effective as postal invitations and were more efficient

E-mail invitations to general practitioners were as effective as postal invitations and were more efficient

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Authors

  • Shaun Treweek
  • Karen Barnett
  • Graeme MacLennan
  • Debbie Bonetti
  • Martin P. Eccles
  • Jill J. Francis
  • Claire Jones
  • Nigel B. Pitts
  • Ian W. Ricketts
  • Mark Weal
  • Frank Sullivan

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Info

Original languageEnglish
Pages793-797
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Journal publication date2012
Volume86
Issue7
Early online date4/02/12
DOIs
StatePublished

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate which of two invitation methods, e-mail or post, was most effective at recruiting general practitioners (GPs) to an online trial. Study Design and Setting: Randomized controlled trial. Participants were GPs in Scotland, United Kingdom. Results: Two hundred and seventy GPs were recruited. Using e-mail did not improve recruitment (risk difference = 0.7% [95% confidence interval -2.7% to 4.1%]). E-mail was, however, simpler to use and cheaper, costing £3.20 per recruit compared with £15.69 for postal invitations. Reminders increased recruitment by around 4% for each reminder sent for both invitation methods. Conclusions: In the Scottish context, inviting GPs to take part in an online trial by e-mail does not adversely affect recruitment and is logistically easier and cheaper than using postal invitations. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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