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Excision of a submandibular gland

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Excision of a submandibular gland : a safe day case procedure?. / Laverick, S.; McLoughlin, P.M.; Chandramohan, J.

In: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 50, No. 6, 2012, p. 567-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Laverick, S, McLoughlin, PM & Chandramohan, J 2012, 'Excision of a submandibular gland: a safe day case procedure?' British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, vol 50, no. 6, pp. 567-568., 10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.10.012

APA

Laverick, S., McLoughlin, P. M., & Chandramohan, J. (2012). Excision of a submandibular gland: a safe day case procedure?. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 50(6), 567-568. 10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.10.012

Vancouver

Laverick S, McLoughlin PM, Chandramohan J. Excision of a submandibular gland: a safe day case procedure?. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 2012;50(6):567-568. Available from: 10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.10.012

Author

Laverick, S.; McLoughlin, P.M.; Chandramohan, J. / Excision of a submandibular gland : a safe day case procedure?.

In: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 50, No. 6, 2012, p. 567-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{6302eb8f944f44c1b7c6b998b020e71e,
title = "Excision of a submandibular gland: a safe day case procedure?",
author = "S. Laverick and P.M. McLoughlin and J. Chandramohan",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.10.012",
volume = "50",
number = "6",
pages = "567--568",
journal = "British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery",
issn = "0266-4356",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Excision of a submandibular gland

T2 - a safe day case procedure?

A1 - Laverick,S.

A1 - McLoughlin,P.M.

A1 - Chandramohan,J.

AU - Laverick,S.

AU - McLoughlin,P.M.

AU - Chandramohan,J.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - There are considerable benefits, both for patients and hospitals, if operations are done as day case procedures. Excision of a submandibular gland is a relatively common operation and it is usual practice for surgeons to be cautious, admit the patient for an overnight stay, and leave a drain in place. To assess the amount of postoperative bleeding into the wound (and hence potential risk to the airway) we have studied prospectively the amount of drainage that occurs. Sixty consecutive patients admitted for overnight postoperative monitoring after excision of a submandibular gland had a suction drain placed as part of the procedure. Drainage was measured by departmental staff at regular intervals during the following 24 h. Nearly all the patients drained 40 ml or less (mean 18 ml) and in all cases there was a clear decrease in the volumes drained over the first 6-8 h postoperatively. Drainage then became negligible. The plateau in drainage was evident regardless of the initial volume drained. Surgeons should be confident that drainage will cease after 6-8 h in most patients, and residual drainage is negligible. © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

AB - There are considerable benefits, both for patients and hospitals, if operations are done as day case procedures. Excision of a submandibular gland is a relatively common operation and it is usual practice for surgeons to be cautious, admit the patient for an overnight stay, and leave a drain in place. To assess the amount of postoperative bleeding into the wound (and hence potential risk to the airway) we have studied prospectively the amount of drainage that occurs. Sixty consecutive patients admitted for overnight postoperative monitoring after excision of a submandibular gland had a suction drain placed as part of the procedure. Drainage was measured by departmental staff at regular intervals during the following 24 h. Nearly all the patients drained 40 ml or less (mean 18 ml) and in all cases there was a clear decrease in the volumes drained over the first 6-8 h postoperatively. Drainage then became negligible. The plateau in drainage was evident regardless of the initial volume drained. Surgeons should be confident that drainage will cease after 6-8 h in most patients, and residual drainage is negligible. © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864575764&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.10.012

DO - 10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.10.012

M1 - Article

JO - British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

JF - British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

SN - 0266-4356

IS - 6

VL - 50

SP - 567

EP - 568

ER -

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