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Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?

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Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?. / Mutrie, Nanette; Campbell, Anna; Barry, Sarah; Hefferon, Kate; McConnachie, Alex; Ritchie, Diana; Tovey, Sian.

In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2012, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Mutrie, N, Campbell, A, Barry, S, Hefferon, K, McConnachie, A, Ritchie, D & Tovey, S 2012, 'Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?' Journal of Cancer Survivorship, pp. 1-11., 10.1007/s11764-012-0233-y

APA

Mutrie, N., Campbell, A., Barry, S., Hefferon, K., McConnachie, A., Ritchie, D., & Tovey, S. (2012). Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 1-11. 10.1007/s11764-012-0233-y

Vancouver

Mutrie N, Campbell A, Barry S, Hefferon K, McConnachie A, Ritchie D et al. Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?. Journal of Cancer Survivorship. 2012;1-11. Available from: 10.1007/s11764-012-0233-y

Author

Mutrie, Nanette; Campbell, Anna; Barry, Sarah; Hefferon, Kate; McConnachie, Alex; Ritchie, Diana; Tovey, Sian / Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?.

In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2012, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{e9718a1eb8ce428b8abdb243aa249ed6,
title = "Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?",
author = "Nanette Mutrie and Anna Campbell and Sarah Barry and Kate Hefferon and Alex McConnachie and Diana Ritchie and Sian Tovey",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1007/s11764-012-0233-y",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "Journal of Cancer Survivorship",
issn = "1932-2259",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Five-year follow-up of participants in a randomised controlled trial showing benefits from exercise for breast cancer survivors during adjuvant treatment. Are there lasting effects?

A1 - Mutrie,Nanette

A1 - Campbell,Anna

A1 - Barry,Sarah

A1 - Hefferon,Kate

A1 - McConnachie,Alex

A1 - Ritchie,Diana

A1 - Tovey,Sian

AU - Mutrie,Nanette

AU - Campbell,Anna

AU - Barry,Sarah

AU - Hefferon,Kate

AU - McConnachie,Alex

AU - Ritchie,Diana

AU - Tovey,Sian

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Purpose: In an earlier randomised controlled trial, we showed that early stage breast cancer patients who received a supervised exercise programme, with discussion of behaviour change techniques, had psychological and functional benefits 6 months after the intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine if benefits observed at 6 months persisted 18 and 60 months later. Methods: Women who were in the original trial were contacted at 18 and 60 months after intervention. Original measures were repeated. Results: Of the 148 women from the original study who agreed to be contacted again, 114 attended for follow-up at 18 months and 87 at 60 months. Women in the original intervention group reported more leisure time physical activity and more positive moods at 60 months than women in the original control group. Irrespective of original group allocation, women who were more active consistently reported lower levels of depression and increased quality of life compared to those who were less active. Conclusions: We have shown that there are lasting benefits to an exercise intervention delivered during treatment to breast cancer survivors. Regular activity should be encouraged for women with early stage breast cancer as this can have lasting implications for physical and psychological functioning. © 2012 The Author(s).

AB - Purpose: In an earlier randomised controlled trial, we showed that early stage breast cancer patients who received a supervised exercise programme, with discussion of behaviour change techniques, had psychological and functional benefits 6 months after the intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine if benefits observed at 6 months persisted 18 and 60 months later. Methods: Women who were in the original trial were contacted at 18 and 60 months after intervention. Original measures were repeated. Results: Of the 148 women from the original study who agreed to be contacted again, 114 attended for follow-up at 18 months and 87 at 60 months. Women in the original intervention group reported more leisure time physical activity and more positive moods at 60 months than women in the original control group. Irrespective of original group allocation, women who were more active consistently reported lower levels of depression and increased quality of life compared to those who were less active. Conclusions: We have shown that there are lasting benefits to an exercise intervention delivered during treatment to breast cancer survivors. Regular activity should be encouraged for women with early stage breast cancer as this can have lasting implications for physical and psychological functioning. © 2012 The Author(s).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864125598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11764-012-0233-y

DO - 10.1007/s11764-012-0233-y

M1 - Article

JO - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

JF - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

SN - 1932-2259

SP - 1

EP - 11

ER -

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