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Identification of Bacillus subtilis SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation

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Identification of Bacillus subtilis SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation. / Terra, Rebecca; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; Cao, Guoqiang; Lazazzera, Beth A.

In: Journal of Bacteriology, Vol. 194, No. 11, 06.2012, p. 2781-2790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Terra, R, Stanley-Wall, NR, Cao, G & Lazazzera, BA 2012, 'Identification of Bacillus subtilis SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation' Journal of Bacteriology, vol 194, no. 11, pp. 2781-2790., 10.1128/JB.06780-11

APA

Terra, R., Stanley-Wall, N. R., Cao, G., & Lazazzera, B. A. (2012). Identification of Bacillus subtilis SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation. Journal of Bacteriology, 194(11), 2781-2790. 10.1128/JB.06780-11

Vancouver

Terra R, Stanley-Wall NR, Cao G, Lazazzera BA. Identification of Bacillus subtilis SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation. Journal of Bacteriology. 2012 Jun;194(11):2781-2790. Available from: 10.1128/JB.06780-11

Author

Terra, Rebecca; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; Cao, Guoqiang; Lazazzera, Beth A. / Identification of Bacillus subtilis SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation.

In: Journal of Bacteriology, Vol. 194, No. 11, 06.2012, p. 2781-2790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{07881af6c68543bc95533386f02f4cbf,
title = "Identification of Bacillus subtilis SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation",
author = "Rebecca Terra and Stanley-Wall, {Nicola R.} and Guoqiang Cao and Lazazzera, {Beth A.}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1128/JB.06780-11",
volume = "194",
number = "11",
pages = "2781--2790",
journal = "Journal of Bacteriology",
issn = "0021-9193",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identification of <em>Bacillus subtilis </em>SipW as a Bifunctional Signal Peptidase That Controls Surface-Adhered Biofilm Formation

A1 - Terra,Rebecca

A1 - Stanley-Wall,Nicola R.

A1 - Cao,Guoqiang

A1 - Lazazzera,Beth A.

AU - Terra,Rebecca

AU - Stanley-Wall,Nicola R.

AU - Cao,Guoqiang

AU - Lazazzera,Beth A.

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - <p>Biofilms of microbial cells encased in an exopolymeric matrix can form on solid surfaces, but how bacteria sense a solid surface and upregulate biofilm genes is largely unknown. We investigated the role of the Bacillus subtilis signal peptidase, SipW, which has a unique role in forming biofilms on a solid surface and is not required at an air-liquid interface. Surprisingly, we found that the signal peptidase activity of SipW was not required for solid-surface biofilms. Furthermore, a SipW mutant protein was constructed that lacks the ability to form a solid-surface biofilm but still retains signal peptidase activity. Through genetic and gene expression tests, the non-signal peptidase role of SipW was found to activate biofilm matrix genes specifically when cells were on a solid surface. These data provide the first evidence that a signal peptidase is bifunctional and that SipW has a regulatory role in addition to its role as a signal peptidase.</p>

AB - <p>Biofilms of microbial cells encased in an exopolymeric matrix can form on solid surfaces, but how bacteria sense a solid surface and upregulate biofilm genes is largely unknown. We investigated the role of the Bacillus subtilis signal peptidase, SipW, which has a unique role in forming biofilms on a solid surface and is not required at an air-liquid interface. Surprisingly, we found that the signal peptidase activity of SipW was not required for solid-surface biofilms. Furthermore, a SipW mutant protein was constructed that lacks the ability to form a solid-surface biofilm but still retains signal peptidase activity. Through genetic and gene expression tests, the non-signal peptidase role of SipW was found to activate biofilm matrix genes specifically when cells were on a solid surface. These data provide the first evidence that a signal peptidase is bifunctional and that SipW has a regulatory role in addition to its role as a signal peptidase.</p>

U2 - 10.1128/JB.06780-11

DO - 10.1128/JB.06780-11

M1 - Article

JO - Journal of Bacteriology

JF - Journal of Bacteriology

SN - 0021-9193

IS - 11

VL - 194

SP - 2781

EP - 2790

ER -

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