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Reducing prescribing errors

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Reducing prescribing errors : can a well-designed electronic system help?. / Went, Kathryn; Antoniewicz, Patricia; Corner, Deborah A.; Dailly, Stella; Gregor, Peter; Joss, Judith; McIntyre, Fiona B.; McLeod, Shaun; Ricketts, Ian W.; Shearer, Alfred J.

In: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2010, p. 556-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Went, K, Antoniewicz, P, Corner, DA, Dailly, S, Gregor, P, Joss, J, McIntyre, FB, McLeod, S, Ricketts, IW & Shearer, AJ 2010, 'Reducing prescribing errors: can a well-designed electronic system help?' Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, vol 16, no. 3, pp. 556-559., 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01159.x

APA

Went, K., Antoniewicz, P., Corner, D. A., Dailly, S., Gregor, P., Joss, J., ... Shearer, A. J. (2010). Reducing prescribing errors: can a well-designed electronic system help?. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 16(3), 556-559. 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01159.x

Vancouver

Went K, Antoniewicz P, Corner DA, Dailly S, Gregor P, Joss J et al. Reducing prescribing errors: can a well-designed electronic system help?. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. 2010 Jun;16(3):556-559. Available from: 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01159.x

Author

Went, Kathryn; Antoniewicz, Patricia; Corner, Deborah A.; Dailly, Stella; Gregor, Peter; Joss, Judith; McIntyre, Fiona B.; McLeod, Shaun; Ricketts, Ian W.; Shearer, Alfred J. / Reducing prescribing errors : can a well-designed electronic system help?.

In: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2010, p. 556-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{7508925e3bd54e3a93e6277d0afbf5fb,
title = "Reducing prescribing errors: can a well-designed electronic system help?",
keywords = "intensive care units, medical order entry systems, medication error - prevention and control, user-computer interface, PHYSICIAN ORDER ENTRY, MEDICATION ERRORS, UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES, INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY, CRITICAL-CARE, STAFF",
author = "Kathryn Went and Patricia Antoniewicz and Corner, {Deborah A.} and Stella Dailly and Peter Gregor and Judith Joss and McIntyre, {Fiona B.} and Shaun McLeod and Ricketts, {Ian W.} and Shearer, {Alfred J.}",
note = "MEDLINE® is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01159.x",
volume = "16",
number = "3",
pages = "556--559",
journal = "Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice",
issn = "1356-1294",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reducing prescribing errors

T2 - can a well-designed electronic system help?

A1 - Went,Kathryn

A1 - Antoniewicz,Patricia

A1 - Corner,Deborah A.

A1 - Dailly,Stella

A1 - Gregor,Peter

A1 - Joss,Judith

A1 - McIntyre,Fiona B.

A1 - McLeod,Shaun

A1 - Ricketts,Ian W.

A1 - Shearer,Alfred J.

AU - Went,Kathryn

AU - Antoniewicz,Patricia

AU - Corner,Deborah A.

AU - Dailly,Stella

AU - Gregor,Peter

AU - Joss,Judith

AU - McIntyre,Fiona B.

AU - McLeod,Shaun

AU - Ricketts,Ian W.

AU - Shearer,Alfred J.

PY - 2010/6

Y1 - 2010/6

N2 - <p>Rationale, aims and objectives</p><p>In this study, the aim was to investigate if an electronic prescribing system designed specifically to reduce errors would lead to fewer errors in prescribing medicines in a secondary care setting.</p><p>Method</p><p>The electronic system was compared with paper prescription charts on 16 intensive care patients to assess any change in the number of prescribing errors.</p><p>Results</p><p>The overall level of compliance with nationally accepted standards was significantly higher with the electronic system (91.67%) compared with the paper system (46.73%). Electronically generated prescriptions were found to contain significantly fewer deviations (28 in 329 prescriptions, 8.5%) than the written prescriptions (208 in 408 prescriptions, 51%).</p><p>Conclusion</p><p>Taking an interdisciplinary approach to work on the creation of a system designed to minimize the risk of error has resulted in a favoured system that significantly reduces the number of errors made.</p>

AB - <p>Rationale, aims and objectives</p><p>In this study, the aim was to investigate if an electronic prescribing system designed specifically to reduce errors would lead to fewer errors in prescribing medicines in a secondary care setting.</p><p>Method</p><p>The electronic system was compared with paper prescription charts on 16 intensive care patients to assess any change in the number of prescribing errors.</p><p>Results</p><p>The overall level of compliance with nationally accepted standards was significantly higher with the electronic system (91.67%) compared with the paper system (46.73%). Electronically generated prescriptions were found to contain significantly fewer deviations (28 in 329 prescriptions, 8.5%) than the written prescriptions (208 in 408 prescriptions, 51%).</p><p>Conclusion</p><p>Taking an interdisciplinary approach to work on the creation of a system designed to minimize the risk of error has resulted in a favoured system that significantly reduces the number of errors made.</p>

KW - intensive care units

KW - medical order entry systems

KW - medication error - prevention and control

KW - user-computer interface

KW - PHYSICIAN ORDER ENTRY

KW - MEDICATION ERRORS

KW - UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES

KW - INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY

KW - CRITICAL-CARE

KW - STAFF

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952903570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01159.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01159.x

M1 - Article

JO - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice

JF - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice

SN - 1356-1294

IS - 3

VL - 16

SP - 556

EP - 559

ER -

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