Discovery - University of Dundee - Online Publications

Library & Learning Centre

Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by Bacillus subtilis

Standard

Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by Bacillus subtilis. / Davidson, Fordyce A.; Yi, Chung-Seon; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 7, No. 6, e38574, 20.06.2012, p. -.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Davidson, FA, Yi, C-S & Stanley-Wall, NR 2012, 'Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by Bacillus subtilis' PLoS ONE, vol 7, no. 6, e38574, pp. -.

APA

Davidson, F. A., Yi, C-S., & Stanley-Wall, N. R. (2012). Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by Bacillus subtilis. PLoS ONE, 7(6), -[e38574]doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0038574

Vancouver

Davidson FA, Yi C-S, Stanley-Wall NR. Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by Bacillus subtilis. PLoS ONE. 2012 Jun 20;7(6):-. e38574.

Author

Davidson, Fordyce A.; Yi, Chung-Seon; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R. / Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by Bacillus subtilis.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 7, No. 6, e38574, 20.06.2012, p. -.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{5ae7f46c39014b8e847677c324ea7313,
title = "Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by <em>Bacillus subtilis</em>",
author = "Davidson, {Fordyce A.} and Chung-Seon Yi and Stanley-Wall, {Nicola R.}",
year = "2012",
volume = "7",
number = "6",
pages = "--",
journal = "PLoS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Selective Heterogeneity in Exoprotease Production by <em>Bacillus subtilis</em>

A1 - Davidson,Fordyce A.

A1 - Yi,Chung-Seon

A1 - Stanley-Wall,Nicola R.

AU - Davidson,Fordyce A.

AU - Yi,Chung-Seon

AU - Stanley-Wall,Nicola R.

PY - 2012/6/20

Y1 - 2012/6/20

N2 - <p>Bacteria have elaborate signalling mechanisms to ensure a behavioural response that is most likely to enhance survival in a changing environment. It is becoming increasingly apparent that as part of this response, bacteria are capable of cell differentiation and can generate multiple, mutually exclusive co-existing cell states. These cell states are often associated with multicellular processes that bring benefit to the community as a whole but which may be, paradoxically, disadvantageous to an individual subpopulation. How this process of cell differentiation is controlled is intriguing and remains a largely open question. In this paper, we consider an important aspect of cell differentiation that is known to occur in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis: we investigate the role of two master regulators DegU and Spo0A in the control of extra-cellular protease production. Recent work in this area focussed the on role of DegU in this process and suggested that transient effects in protein production were the drivers of cell-response heterogeneity. Here, using a combination of mathematical modelling, analysis and stochastic simulations, we provide a complementary analysis of this regulatory system that investigates the roles of both DegU and Spo0A in extra-cellular protease production. In doing so, we present a mechanism for bimodality, or system heterogeneity, without the need for a bistable switch in the underlying regulatory network. Moreover, our analysis leads us to conclude that this heterogeneity is in fact a persistent, stable feature. Our results suggest that system response is divided into three zones: low and high signal levels induce a unimodal or undifferentiated response from the cell population with all cells OFF and ON, respectively for exoprotease production. However, for intermediate levels of signal, a heterogeneous response is predicted with a spread of activity levels, representing typical "bet-hedging" behaviour.</p>

AB - <p>Bacteria have elaborate signalling mechanisms to ensure a behavioural response that is most likely to enhance survival in a changing environment. It is becoming increasingly apparent that as part of this response, bacteria are capable of cell differentiation and can generate multiple, mutually exclusive co-existing cell states. These cell states are often associated with multicellular processes that bring benefit to the community as a whole but which may be, paradoxically, disadvantageous to an individual subpopulation. How this process of cell differentiation is controlled is intriguing and remains a largely open question. In this paper, we consider an important aspect of cell differentiation that is known to occur in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis: we investigate the role of two master regulators DegU and Spo0A in the control of extra-cellular protease production. Recent work in this area focussed the on role of DegU in this process and suggested that transient effects in protein production were the drivers of cell-response heterogeneity. Here, using a combination of mathematical modelling, analysis and stochastic simulations, we provide a complementary analysis of this regulatory system that investigates the roles of both DegU and Spo0A in extra-cellular protease production. In doing so, we present a mechanism for bimodality, or system heterogeneity, without the need for a bistable switch in the underlying regulatory network. Moreover, our analysis leads us to conclude that this heterogeneity is in fact a persistent, stable feature. Our results suggest that system response is divided into three zones: low and high signal levels induce a unimodal or undifferentiated response from the cell population with all cells OFF and ON, respectively for exoprotease production. However, for intermediate levels of signal, a heterogeneous response is predicted with a spread of activity levels, representing typical "bet-hedging" behaviour.</p>

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0038574

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0038574

M1 - Article

JO - PLoS ONE

JF - PLoS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 6

VL - 7

SP - -

ER -

Documents

Library & Learning Centre

Contact | Accessibility | Policy