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The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants

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The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants. / Schulman, A.H.; Flavell, A.J.; Paux, E.; Ellis, T.H.N.

Mobile genetic elements: protocols and genomic applications. ed. / John M. Walker; Yves Bigot. 2nd. ed. New York : Humana Press, 2012. p. 115-153 (Methods in Molecular Biology).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Schulman, AH, Flavell, AJ, Paux, E & Ellis, THN 2012, 'The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants'. in JM Walker & Y Bigot (eds), Mobile genetic elements: protocols and genomic applications. 2nd edn, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 859, Humana Press, New York, pp. 115-153.

APA

Schulman, A. H., Flavell, A. J., Paux, E., & Ellis, T. H. N. (2012). The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants. In Walker, J. M., & Bigot, Y. (Eds.), Mobile genetic elements. (2nd ed.) (pp. 115-153). (Methods in Molecular Biology). New York: Humana Press. doi: 10.1007/978-1-61779-603-6_7

Vancouver

Schulman AH, Flavell AJ, Paux E, Ellis THN. The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants. In Walker JM, Bigot Y, editors, Mobile genetic elements: protocols and genomic applications. 2nd ed. New York: Humana Press. 2012. p. 115-153. (Methods in Molecular Biology).

Author

Schulman, A.H.; Flavell, A.J.; Paux, E.; Ellis, T.H.N. / The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants.

Mobile genetic elements: protocols and genomic applications. ed. / John M. Walker; Yves Bigot. 2nd. ed. New York : Humana Press, 2012. p. 115-153 (Methods in Molecular Biology).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{ccd9bbded493493bab8b150bf66a1b7d,
title = "The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants",
publisher = "Humana Press",
author = "A.H. Schulman and A.J. Flavell and E. Paux and T.H.N. Ellis",
year = "2012",
editor = "Walker, {John M.} and Yves Bigot",
edition = "2nd",
isbn = "9781617796029",
series = "Methods in Molecular Biology",
pages = "115-153",
booktitle = "Mobile genetic elements",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - The application of LTR retrotransposons as molecular markers in plants

A1 - Schulman,A.H.

A1 - Flavell,A.J.

A1 - Paux,E.

A1 - Ellis,T.H.N.

AU - Schulman,A.H.

AU - Flavell,A.J.

AU - Paux,E.

AU - Ellis,T.H.N.

PB - Humana Press

CY - New York

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Retrotransposons are a major agent of genome evolution. Various molecular marker systems have been developed that exploit the ubiquitous nature of these genetic elements and their property of stable integration into dispersed chromosomal loci that are polymorphic within species. The key methods, SSAP, IRAP, REMAP, RBIP, and ISBP, all detect the sites at which the retrotransposon DNA, which is conserved between families of elements, is integrated into the genome. Marker systems exploiting these methods can be easily developed and inexpensively deployed in the absence of extensive genome sequence data. They offer access to the dynamic and polymorphic, nongenic portion of the genome and thereby complement methods, such as gene-derived SNPs, that target primarily the genic fraction. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

AB - Retrotransposons are a major agent of genome evolution. Various molecular marker systems have been developed that exploit the ubiquitous nature of these genetic elements and their property of stable integration into dispersed chromosomal loci that are polymorphic within species. The key methods, SSAP, IRAP, REMAP, RBIP, and ISBP, all detect the sites at which the retrotransposon DNA, which is conserved between families of elements, is integrated into the genome. Marker systems exploiting these methods can be easily developed and inexpensively deployed in the absence of extensive genome sequence data. They offer access to the dynamic and polymorphic, nongenic portion of the genome and thereby complement methods, such as gene-derived SNPs, that target primarily the genic fraction. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-61779-603-6_7

DO - 10.1007/978-1-61779-603-6_7

M1 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 9781617796029

BT - Mobile genetic elements

T2 - Mobile genetic elements

A2 - Bigot,Yves

ED - Bigot,Yves

T3 - Methods in Molecular Biology

T3 - en_GB

SP - 115

EP - 153

ER -

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