Aphasia group launches app to explain the condition

Press/Media: Other

Description

Cabinet Secretary for Health and Sport Shona Robison was at the University today to help launch a new app created by people with aphasia to help those living with the condition.

The ‘I Have Aphasia’ app, which was created in partnership with people with aphasia living in Tayside, shows a short animated film outlining the key communication difficulties people with aphasia face. This film is a tool that people with aphasia can share with others to explain the challenges they face and the animation illustrates how people can assist anyone with aphasia through understanding and patience.  

Aphasia is a complex language and communication disorder resulting from damage to the language centres of the brain. This damage may be caused by a stroke, a head injury, a brain tumour or another neurological illness. It is estimated that there are over 350,000 people with aphasia living in Britain.

The app was developed during a collaborative programme run in partnership with Tayside Healthcare Arts Trust’s ST/ART Project and the Tap and Talk Aphasia iPad group, based at the User Centre of the University’s School of Science and Engineering.

During the eight week programme, members of the group shared their personal experiences of aphasia and worked with professional animator Andrew Low to shape and direct the production of a film and the short app animation. With support from Stirling-based software development firm DOGFI.SH Mobile, the short animation has now been reproduced as a free downloadable app from the Apple App store for iPhones and iPads.

The launch of the app today also helped mark Aphasia Awareness Month.

Cabinet Secretary Shona Robison joined participants of the Tap and Talk group, NHS Tayside Chairman Professor John Connell, Director of Allied Health Professions Karen Anderson, NHS Tayside Board member Alison Rogers and Professor Sir Pete Downes, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Dundee, to officially launch the app.

Ms Robison said, “We are committed to ensure that everybody living in Scotland with stroke, and other neurological conditions that cause aphasia, has access to the best patient care possible.

“Communication is a key element, and it is extremely encouraging to see partnership working to develop technological innovations such as this app, which can help to support those experiencing challenges communicating as a result of their aphasia.”

Professor Sir Pete Downes said, “This is a strong example of our collaborations with extra-ordinary users and shows again the value of embedding the User Centre within Computing at the University. It demonstrates the difference we can make, not only to the lives of older people or people with a disability, but also to our computing graduates who develop skills in developing technology for a wide range of users.”

Professor Connell said, “I am pleased to attend today’s event to mark the launch of the app and celebrate the hard work of the participants involved with the ST/ART project. The collaborative project has been very much driven by the participants, who by sharing their own experiences with aphasia, have created an app that will potentially help others with the condition. It is a great example of how collaboration with the University of Dundee drives benefit for patients.”

ST/ART projects coordinator Chris Kelly said, “The group were really focused and worked so hard on their message during the project. This made it easy for all the partners to get behind the idea of the app and take it to this new level. It is a wonderful example of empowerment that will potentially benefit thousands of people.”

The app is available at http://aphasia.dogfish.tech for free download from the Apple App Store from today (Friday, 30 June).

The ST/ART project, which has been in place since 2004, provides creative engagement opportunities for stroke survivors, using participatory arts as part of their rehabilitation and recovery.

ST/ART is run by Tayside Healthcare Arts Trust (THAT) in association with NHS Tayside.

For more information on aphasia visit the Stroke Association website at www.stroke.org.uk/what-stroke/what-aphasia

Period30 Jun 2017 → 3 Jul 2017

Media coverage

3

Media coverage

  • TitleDOGFI.SH Mobile teams up with Tayside community to launch I Have Aphasia app
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletBuilding Better Healthcare BBH
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date3/07/17
    DescriptionMobile app designed to help improve education, understanding, and communication around aphasia.

    Stirling-based DOGFI.SH Mobile has partnered with Tayside Healthcare Arts Trust’s ST/ART Project and the Tap and Talk Aphasia iPad group at the University of Dundee to launch a new app designed to assist people living with aphasia in better communicating their condition to others.

    Aphasia is a complex language and communication disorder resulting from damage to the language centres of the brain.

    This damage may be caused by a stroke, a head injury, a brain tumour or another neurological illness and it is estimated that it affects more than 350,000 people in Britain.

    The I Have Aphasia app, which was created in partnership with people who are living with aphasia in Tayside, shows a short animated film outlining the key communication difficulties those with aphasia face.

    This film is a tool that people with aphasia can share with others to explain the challenges they face, with the animation illustrating how people can assist anyone with aphasia through understanding and patience.

    The app was created following an eight-week programme in which members of the group shared their personal experiences of aphasia and worked with a professional animator who directed the production of a film and the short app animation.

    The creation of the easy-to-use app reinforces how simple technologies can have the power to create real change in people’s lives
    Following this, DOGFI.SH Mobile supported the initiative free of charge by reconfiguring the animation to function as a free, downloadable app available on iOS platforms, which can be easily shared by aphasia sufferers to educate others on the condition.

    DOGFI.SH Mobile chief executive, Ross Tuffee, said: “The creation of the easy-to-use app reinforces how simple technologies can have the power to create real change in people’s lives.

    “Aphasia can be an incredibly-debilitating condition and when we were approached about supporting the project we knew it was something we wanted to be involved in right from the start.

    “Critically, having that direct engagement with Tayside Healthcare Arts Trust’s ST/ART Project and the Tap and Talk Aphasia iPad group, meant we could build an app to suit the very people it serves, ensuring it was both simple to use yet engaging.

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    “For an aphasia sufferer, it gives them a tool to share with others that not only communicates the issues they face, but also illustrates how these challenges can be overcome through understanding and patience.”
    URLhttps://www.buildingbetterhealthcare.co.uk/news/article_page/DOGFISH_Mobile_teams_up_with_Tayside_community_to_launch_iI_Have_Aphasiai_app/131086
    PersonsRolf Black
  • TitleNew app to help aphasia sufferers launched in Dundee
    Degree of recognitionRegional
    Media name/outletThe Courier, Dundee (web)
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date1/07/17
    DescriptionScottish Government health secretary Shona Robison helped launch a new app to help people suffering from aphasia in Dundee yesterday.

    The I Have Apahasia app, which was created with the help of people suffering from the condition in Tayside, can be used to help explain the condition to others.

    The neurological condition, often caused by a stroke or other brain injury, makes it difficult for people to use language correctly.

    They often use the wrong words or sounds. It also causes difficulties in writing and understanding the written word.

    There are around 350,000 people living with aphasia in the UK.

    The app features a short animation that tells people how they can assist people with aphasia.

    It was developed during a collaborative programme run in partnership with Tayside Healthcare Arts Trust’s ST/ART Project and the Tap and Talk Aphasia iPad group, based in Dundee University’s school of science and engineering.

    During the eight-week programme, members of the group shared their experiences of aphasia and then collaborated with animator Andrew Low to create the animation.

    Working with software firm DOGFI.SH, recently acquired by Dundee company Insights, the animation was then turned into a free, downloadable app.

    It was officially launched at Dundee University’s Queen Mother Building.

    Ms Robison said: “We are committed to ensure that everybody living in Scotland with stroke, and other neurological conditions that cause aphasia, has access to the best patient care possible.

    “Communication is a key element, and it is extremely encouraging to see partnership working to develop technological innovations such as this app, which can help to support those experiencing challenges communicating as a result of their aphasia.”


    NHS Tayside chairman Professor John Connell added: “This collaborative project has been very much driven by the participants, who by sharing their own experiences with aphasia, have created an app that will potentially help others with the condition.”

    Dundee University principal Professor Sir Pete Downs said: “This is a strong example of our collaborations with extraordinary users.

    “It demonstrates the difference we can make, not only to the lives of older people or people with a disability, but also to our computing graduates, who develop skills in developing technology for a wide range of users.

    The app is available at http://aphasia.dogfish.tech
    Producer/AuthorStefan Morkis
    URLhttps://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news/local/dundee/460158/new-app-to-help-aphasia-sufferers-launched-in-dundee/
    PersonsRolf Black
  • TitleNew app aims to make living with aphasia easier
    Degree of recognitionRegional
    Media name/outletEvening Telegraph
    Media typePrint
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date30/06/17
    DescriptionCABINET secretary for health and sport Shona Robison attended the official launch of a new app created by people with aphasia to help those living with the condition.
    Aphasia is a complex language and communication disorder resulting from damage to the language centres of the brain.
    It is estimated there are more than 350,000 people with aphasia living in Britain.
    The “I Have Aphasia” app, which was created in partnership with people living in Tayside, shows a short animated film outlining the key communication difficulties sufferers face.
    It was developed during a collaborative programme run in partnership with Tayside Healthcare Arts Trust’s ST/ART Project and the Tap and Talk Aphasia iPad group, based at the user centre of Dundee University’s School of Science and Engineering.
    The app was officially launched at an event at the Queen Mother Building at the university to mark Aphasia Awareness Month.
    Ms Robison joined participants of the Tap and Talk group, NHS Tayside chairman Professor John Connell, director of Allied Health Professions Karen Anderson, NHS Tayside board member Alison Rogers and Professor Sir Pete Downes, principal and vicechancellor of the university.
    Ms Robison said: “We are committed to ensure everybody living in Scotland with stroke, and other neurological conditions that cause aphasia, has access to the best patient care possible.”
    URLpressreader.com/@Rolf_Black/csb_SpvMHbtBEtai5eMyegwUXYdcR9-fbzvrK2LTSxuflSo
    PersonsRolf Black