3D Metal printed heat sinks with longitudinally varying lattice structure sizes using direct metal laser sintering

Deepak Shamvedi (Lead / Corresponding author), Oliver J. McCarthy, Eoghan O’Donoghue, Cyril Danilenkoff, Paul O’Leary, Ramesh Raghavendra

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This research relates to the design, modelling and fabrication of 3D metal printed heat sinks. The heat sinks presented in the research are the commonly used longitudinal fin solid heat sink (LFSHS) and three LFSHS lattice structure designs, differing only in their lattice sizes, fabricated using the Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique in Maraging Steel (MS1), on an EOSINT M280 system. In order to increase the heat sink surface area, the heat sinks are manufactured with mesh lattices along the length of the fins, while keeping the overall heat sink volume constant. The research is focused on pushing the limitations of the DMLS technique for the development of repeating unit, lattice structures heat sinks, and to examine the effect of incrementally varying the lattice sizes with regards to the resultant surface area of the heat sink and the thermal performance of the system. The results obtained under natural convection show that the thermal performance of the LFSHS outperformed all lattice structure heat sinks. This is due to the fact that, the pressure drop across the lattice heat sinks were so high, due to lattice meshes that it negated the positive effect of the greater surface area.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)301-310
    Number of pages10
    JournalVirtual and Physical Prototyping
    Volume13
    Issue number4
    Early online date27 May 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Keywords

    • 3D printing
    • additive manufacturing
    • heat sink
    • lattice structures

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '3D Metal printed heat sinks with longitudinally varying lattice structure sizes using direct metal laser sintering'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this