3D Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression

Faisel Khan, Jonathan Weir-Mccall, R. D. White, Stephen Gandy, Prasad Ramkumar, Jill Belch, Allan Struthers, John Houston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim To determine the ability of whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) to measure global atheroma burden progression. Methods 50 consecutive patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease referred for clinical MRA were recruited. WB-MRA was performed at baseline, 6 months and 3 years. WB-MRA data was analysed by dividing the vasculature into 31 anatomical arterial segments. Each segment was scored according to degree of luminal narrowing: 0=normal, 1 = <50%, 2 = 50–70%, 3 = 71–99%, 4 = vessel occlusion. From this a standardised atheroma score (SAS) was calculated with a maximum score of 100 and minimum score of 0. Progression was assessed with repeat measure ANOVA. Results 36 patients were scanned at 0 and 6 months, with 26 patients scanned at the three year follow up. Only those who completed all 3 visits were included in the final analysis. At 3 years, n = 18 demonstrated atheroma progression while n = 8 showed stable or improved disease. Those with no progression had significantly lower baseline SAS, and were more likely to be on statin therapy (p < 0.05 for both). Baseline SAS was 15.7 ± 10.3 at baseline with no progression at 6 months (SAS=16.4 ± 10.5, p = 0.67). At 3 years there was significant progression in atheroma (SAS = 17.7 ± 11.5, p = 0.01) (Figure 1). On multiple linear regression, age (β 0.14 p = 0.014), pulse pressure (β −0.12 p = 0.005) and ankle-brachial pressure index (β −7.7 p = 0.036) were independently associated with the rate of progression. Conclusion Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression at 3 year follow-up even in a small cohort.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberA17
JournalHeart
Volume101
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2015

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Atherosclerotic Plaques
Atherosclerosis
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Ankle Brachial Index
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Linear Models
Analysis of Variance
Blood Pressure
Pressure

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Khan, Faisel ; Weir-Mccall, Jonathan ; White, R. D. ; Gandy, Stephen ; Ramkumar, Prasad ; Belch, Jill ; Struthers, Allan ; Houston, John. / 3D Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression. In: Heart. 2015 ; Vol. 101, No. 2.
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title = "3D Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression",
abstract = "Aim To determine the ability of whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) to measure global atheroma burden progression. Methods 50 consecutive patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease referred for clinical MRA were recruited. WB-MRA was performed at baseline, 6 months and 3 years. WB-MRA data was analysed by dividing the vasculature into 31 anatomical arterial segments. Each segment was scored according to degree of luminal narrowing: 0=normal, 1 = <50{\%}, 2 = 50–70{\%}, 3 = 71–99{\%}, 4 = vessel occlusion. From this a standardised atheroma score (SAS) was calculated with a maximum score of 100 and minimum score of 0. Progression was assessed with repeat measure ANOVA. Results 36 patients were scanned at 0 and 6 months, with 26 patients scanned at the three year follow up. Only those who completed all 3 visits were included in the final analysis. At 3 years, n = 18 demonstrated atheroma progression while n = 8 showed stable or improved disease. Those with no progression had significantly lower baseline SAS, and were more likely to be on statin therapy (p < 0.05 for both). Baseline SAS was 15.7 ± 10.3 at baseline with no progression at 6 months (SAS=16.4 ± 10.5, p = 0.67). At 3 years there was significant progression in atheroma (SAS = 17.7 ± 11.5, p = 0.01) (Figure 1). On multiple linear regression, age (β 0.14 p = 0.014), pulse pressure (β −0.12 p = 0.005) and ankle-brachial pressure index (β −7.7 p = 0.036) were independently associated with the rate of progression. Conclusion Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression at 3 year follow-up even in a small cohort.",
author = "Faisel Khan and Jonathan Weir-Mccall and White, {R. D.} and Stephen Gandy and Prasad Ramkumar and Jill Belch and Allan Struthers and John Houston",
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3D Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression. / Khan, Faisel; Weir-Mccall, Jonathan; White, R. D.; Gandy, Stephen; Ramkumar, Prasad; Belch, Jill; Struthers, Allan; Houston, John.

In: Heart, Vol. 101, No. 2, A17, 26.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - 3D Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression

AU - Khan, Faisel

AU - Weir-Mccall, Jonathan

AU - White, R. D.

AU - Gandy, Stephen

AU - Ramkumar, Prasad

AU - Belch, Jill

AU - Struthers, Allan

AU - Houston, John

PY - 2015/4/26

Y1 - 2015/4/26

N2 - Aim To determine the ability of whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) to measure global atheroma burden progression. Methods 50 consecutive patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease referred for clinical MRA were recruited. WB-MRA was performed at baseline, 6 months and 3 years. WB-MRA data was analysed by dividing the vasculature into 31 anatomical arterial segments. Each segment was scored according to degree of luminal narrowing: 0=normal, 1 = <50%, 2 = 50–70%, 3 = 71–99%, 4 = vessel occlusion. From this a standardised atheroma score (SAS) was calculated with a maximum score of 100 and minimum score of 0. Progression was assessed with repeat measure ANOVA. Results 36 patients were scanned at 0 and 6 months, with 26 patients scanned at the three year follow up. Only those who completed all 3 visits were included in the final analysis. At 3 years, n = 18 demonstrated atheroma progression while n = 8 showed stable or improved disease. Those with no progression had significantly lower baseline SAS, and were more likely to be on statin therapy (p < 0.05 for both). Baseline SAS was 15.7 ± 10.3 at baseline with no progression at 6 months (SAS=16.4 ± 10.5, p = 0.67). At 3 years there was significant progression in atheroma (SAS = 17.7 ± 11.5, p = 0.01) (Figure 1). On multiple linear regression, age (β 0.14 p = 0.014), pulse pressure (β −0.12 p = 0.005) and ankle-brachial pressure index (β −7.7 p = 0.036) were independently associated with the rate of progression. Conclusion Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression at 3 year follow-up even in a small cohort.

AB - Aim To determine the ability of whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) to measure global atheroma burden progression. Methods 50 consecutive patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease referred for clinical MRA were recruited. WB-MRA was performed at baseline, 6 months and 3 years. WB-MRA data was analysed by dividing the vasculature into 31 anatomical arterial segments. Each segment was scored according to degree of luminal narrowing: 0=normal, 1 = <50%, 2 = 50–70%, 3 = 71–99%, 4 = vessel occlusion. From this a standardised atheroma score (SAS) was calculated with a maximum score of 100 and minimum score of 0. Progression was assessed with repeat measure ANOVA. Results 36 patients were scanned at 0 and 6 months, with 26 patients scanned at the three year follow up. Only those who completed all 3 visits were included in the final analysis. At 3 years, n = 18 demonstrated atheroma progression while n = 8 showed stable or improved disease. Those with no progression had significantly lower baseline SAS, and were more likely to be on statin therapy (p < 0.05 for both). Baseline SAS was 15.7 ± 10.3 at baseline with no progression at 6 months (SAS=16.4 ± 10.5, p = 0.67). At 3 years there was significant progression in atheroma (SAS = 17.7 ± 11.5, p = 0.01) (Figure 1). On multiple linear regression, age (β 0.14 p = 0.014), pulse pressure (β −0.12 p = 0.005) and ankle-brachial pressure index (β −7.7 p = 0.036) were independently associated with the rate of progression. Conclusion Whole body contrast enhanced MRA can quantify and monitor atherosclerosis progression at 3 year follow-up even in a small cohort.

U2 - 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-307845.30

DO - 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-307845.30

M3 - Article

VL - 101

JO - Heart

JF - Heart

SN - 1355-6037

IS - 2

M1 - A17

ER -