A 12-year follow-up study of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among 10 532 people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in Tayside, Scotland

K. N. Barnett, S. A. Ogston, M. E. T. McMurdo, A. D. Morris, J. M. M. Evans (Lead / Corresponding author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    50 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aims To determine absolute and relative risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

    Methods In an observational cohort study using record-linkage databases, based in Tayside, Scotland, UK, we identified newly diagnosed patients with Type 2 diabetes in 1993-2004. We also identified a set of non-diabetic comparators from lists of patients registered with a general practice, individually matched to the diabetic patients by sex, age and deprivation. We followed up patients for mortality and cardiovascular mortality over a 12-year period and calculated hazard ratios using Cox regression.

    Results There were 10 532 patients with Type 2 diabetes and 21 056 non-diabetic comparators. Diabetic patients in every age/sex group had higher absolute mortality rates. Even taking deprivation into account, the hazard ratio for mortality was 1.32 (95% CI 1.25-1.40), decreasing to 1.15 (1.09-1.22) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios for cardiovascular mortality were higher, decreasing from 1.51 (1.37-1.67) to 1.23 (1.11-1.36) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, although the difference in absolute rate of mortality increased slightly with age. Increased mortality risks were only evident 2 years after diagnosis and increased thereafter.

    Conclusions Patients with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with non-diabetic comparators, although this is not observable immediately after diagnosis. Age at diagnosis and duration of the disease independently affect absolute and relative mortality risk.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1124-1129
    Number of pages6
    JournalDiabetic Medicine
    Volume27
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • cardiovascular mortality
    • epidemiology
    • mortality
    • risk
    • type 2 diabetes
    • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
    • PROSPECTIVE COHORT
    • MELLITUS
    • RISK
    • POPULATION
    • WOMEN
    • PREVALENCE
    • IMPACT
    • MEN
    • METAANALYSIS

    Cite this

    @article{9eb1d53f020d4c6cb1c5de0665101056,
    title = "A 12-year follow-up study of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among 10 532 people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in Tayside, Scotland",
    abstract = "Aims To determine absolute and relative risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.Methods In an observational cohort study using record-linkage databases, based in Tayside, Scotland, UK, we identified newly diagnosed patients with Type 2 diabetes in 1993-2004. We also identified a set of non-diabetic comparators from lists of patients registered with a general practice, individually matched to the diabetic patients by sex, age and deprivation. We followed up patients for mortality and cardiovascular mortality over a 12-year period and calculated hazard ratios using Cox regression.Results There were 10 532 patients with Type 2 diabetes and 21 056 non-diabetic comparators. Diabetic patients in every age/sex group had higher absolute mortality rates. Even taking deprivation into account, the hazard ratio for mortality was 1.32 (95{\%} CI 1.25-1.40), decreasing to 1.15 (1.09-1.22) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios for cardiovascular mortality were higher, decreasing from 1.51 (1.37-1.67) to 1.23 (1.11-1.36) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, although the difference in absolute rate of mortality increased slightly with age. Increased mortality risks were only evident 2 years after diagnosis and increased thereafter.Conclusions Patients with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with non-diabetic comparators, although this is not observable immediately after diagnosis. Age at diagnosis and duration of the disease independently affect absolute and relative mortality risk.",
    keywords = "cardiovascular mortality, epidemiology, mortality, risk, type 2 diabetes, CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, PROSPECTIVE COHORT, MELLITUS, RISK, POPULATION, WOMEN, PREVALENCE, IMPACT, MEN, METAANALYSIS",
    author = "Barnett, {K. N.} and Ogston, {S. A.} and McMurdo, {M. E. T.} and Morris, {A. D.} and Evans, {J. M. M.}",
    year = "2010",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03075.x",
    language = "English",
    volume = "27",
    pages = "1124--1129",
    journal = "Diabetic Medicine",
    issn = "0742-3071",
    publisher = "Wiley",
    number = "10",

    }

    A 12-year follow-up study of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among 10 532 people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in Tayside, Scotland. / Barnett, K. N.; Ogston, S. A.; McMurdo, M. E. T.; Morris, A. D.; Evans, J. M. M. (Lead / Corresponding author).

    In: Diabetic Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 10, 2010, p. 1124-1129.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A 12-year follow-up study of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among 10 532 people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in Tayside, Scotland

    AU - Barnett, K. N.

    AU - Ogston, S. A.

    AU - McMurdo, M. E. T.

    AU - Morris, A. D.

    AU - Evans, J. M. M.

    PY - 2010

    Y1 - 2010

    N2 - Aims To determine absolute and relative risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.Methods In an observational cohort study using record-linkage databases, based in Tayside, Scotland, UK, we identified newly diagnosed patients with Type 2 diabetes in 1993-2004. We also identified a set of non-diabetic comparators from lists of patients registered with a general practice, individually matched to the diabetic patients by sex, age and deprivation. We followed up patients for mortality and cardiovascular mortality over a 12-year period and calculated hazard ratios using Cox regression.Results There were 10 532 patients with Type 2 diabetes and 21 056 non-diabetic comparators. Diabetic patients in every age/sex group had higher absolute mortality rates. Even taking deprivation into account, the hazard ratio for mortality was 1.32 (95% CI 1.25-1.40), decreasing to 1.15 (1.09-1.22) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios for cardiovascular mortality were higher, decreasing from 1.51 (1.37-1.67) to 1.23 (1.11-1.36) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, although the difference in absolute rate of mortality increased slightly with age. Increased mortality risks were only evident 2 years after diagnosis and increased thereafter.Conclusions Patients with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with non-diabetic comparators, although this is not observable immediately after diagnosis. Age at diagnosis and duration of the disease independently affect absolute and relative mortality risk.

    AB - Aims To determine absolute and relative risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.Methods In an observational cohort study using record-linkage databases, based in Tayside, Scotland, UK, we identified newly diagnosed patients with Type 2 diabetes in 1993-2004. We also identified a set of non-diabetic comparators from lists of patients registered with a general practice, individually matched to the diabetic patients by sex, age and deprivation. We followed up patients for mortality and cardiovascular mortality over a 12-year period and calculated hazard ratios using Cox regression.Results There were 10 532 patients with Type 2 diabetes and 21 056 non-diabetic comparators. Diabetic patients in every age/sex group had higher absolute mortality rates. Even taking deprivation into account, the hazard ratio for mortality was 1.32 (95% CI 1.25-1.40), decreasing to 1.15 (1.09-1.22) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios for cardiovascular mortality were higher, decreasing from 1.51 (1.37-1.67) to 1.23 (1.11-1.36) after adjusting for pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The hazard ratios decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, although the difference in absolute rate of mortality increased slightly with age. Increased mortality risks were only evident 2 years after diagnosis and increased thereafter.Conclusions Patients with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with non-diabetic comparators, although this is not observable immediately after diagnosis. Age at diagnosis and duration of the disease independently affect absolute and relative mortality risk.

    KW - cardiovascular mortality

    KW - epidemiology

    KW - mortality

    KW - risk

    KW - type 2 diabetes

    KW - CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE

    KW - PROSPECTIVE COHORT

    KW - MELLITUS

    KW - RISK

    KW - POPULATION

    KW - WOMEN

    KW - PREVALENCE

    KW - IMPACT

    KW - MEN

    KW - METAANALYSIS

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956798223&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03075.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03075.x

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 20854379

    VL - 27

    SP - 1124

    EP - 1129

    JO - Diabetic Medicine

    JF - Diabetic Medicine

    SN - 0742-3071

    IS - 10

    ER -