A blended learning Approach to teaching foreign policy: Student experiences of learning through face-to-face and online discussion and their relationship to academic performance

A.-M. Bliuc, R.A. Ellis, P. Goodyear, Leanne Piggott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article presents research on students’ experiences of learning through a blend of face-to-face and online discussion. The participants in our study were students enrolled in a foreign policy course at a major Australian university. Students’ conceptions of learning through discussion, and their approaches to both face-to-face and online discussion, were elicited through open-ended questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Students’ responses to both open-ended questionnaires and interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic framework. Qualitative variations in students’ conceptions and approaches were categorised and were found to form a hierarchy. Subsequent quantitative analysis found associations between students’ conceptions of learning through discussion, their approaches to both face-to-face and online discussion and their academic performance (as indicated by the final mark for the course). Implications for teaching and further research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)856-864
Number of pages9
JournalComputers and Education
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Learning through discussion
  • Blended learning
  • Phenomenography
  • Computer mediated communication
  • Teaching/learning strategies

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