A coupled damage-plasticity DEM bond contact model for highly porous rocks

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Abstract

In view of the significant stress loss induced by structural collapse when simulating high-porous soft rocks using traditional damage bond models in DEM ( discrete element method) modelling, a novel damage bond contact model is proposed to capture the ductile failure of high-porous cemented soft rocks. To address the unrealistic physical contact distribution resulting from the use of spherical particles in DEM modelling and consider the physical presence of broken bonds, far-field interaction is introduced between grains when two untouched particles reach a specific activation gap, enabling the generation of stable, highly porous open structure samples while using spherical DEM particles. The final results demonstrate that this newly developed model facilitates the transition from the purely elastic rock-like behaviour stage to the transitional ductile failure stage of porous soft rocks, as well as reproduces the softening/hardening response of soft rocks under different confinements.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2024 UK Association for Computational Mechanics Conference
Subtitle of host publicationDurham, UK, 10-12 April 2024.
EditorsWilliam M. Coombs
PublisherDurham University
Pages132-135
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 10 Apr 2024
EventAnnual Conference of the UK Association for Computational Mechanics. - Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom
Duration: 10 Apr 202413 May 2024
https://sites.google.com/view/ukacm2024conference

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference of the UK Association for Computational Mechanics.
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityDurham
Period10/04/2413/05/24
Internet address

Keywords

  • Displacement pile
  • Large deformations
  • DEM
  • GPFEM
  • Installation
  • Chalk

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