A longitudinal examination of neuropsychological and clinical functioning in boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): improvements in executive functioning do not explain clinical improvement

D. R. Coghill, D. Hayward, S. M. Rhodes, C. Grimmer, K. Matthews

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    76 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often, but not always, persists into adulthood. Investigations of the associations between clinical and biological markers of persistence can shed light on causal pathways. It has been proposed that compensatory improvements in executive neuropsychological functioning are associated with clinical improvements. This is the first study to test this hypothesis prospectively. Method The clinical and neuropsychological functioning of 17 boys with ADHD (mean age 10.45 years at time 1; 14.65 years at time 2) and 17 typically developing (TYP) boys (mean age 10.39 years at time 1; 14.47 years at time 2) was tested on two occasions, 4 years apart. This was done using a battery of standardized neuropsychological tests that included tasks with high and low executive demands.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1087-1099
    Number of pages13
    JournalPsychological Medicine
    Volume44
    Issue number5
    Early online date19 Jul 2013
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

    Keywords

    • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
    • Executive functioning
    • Longitudinal studies
    • Memory
    • Neuropsychology
    • Outcome

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