A modified CPT based installation torque prediction for large screw piles in sand

C. Davidson, T. Al-Baghdadi, M. Brown, A. Brennan, J. Knappett, C. Augarde, W. Coombs, L. Wang, D. Richards, A. Blake, J. Ball

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)
71 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Screw piles have been suggested as an alternative foundation solution to straight-shafted piles for jacket supported offshore wind turbines in deep water. The significant environmental loads in the marine environment will require substantially larger screw piles than those currently employed in onshore applications. This raises questions over the suitability of current design methods for capacity and installation torque. This paper aims to address this issue by presenting a screw pile installation torque prediction method based on cone resistance values from cone penetration test (CPT) data. The proposed method, developed using centrifuge modelling techniques in dry sand, provides accurate predictions of installation torque for both centrifuge and field scale screw piles. Furthermore, unlike existing CPT-torque correlations, the proposed method is shown to be applicable to multi-helix screw piles.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCone Penetration Testing 2018
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Cone Penetration Testing
EditorsMichael A. Hicks, Federico Pisanò, Joek Peuchen
PublisherCRC Press
Pages255-261
Number of pages7
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9780429000485
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jun 2018
EventCTP18 - 4th International Symposium on Cone Penetration Testing - Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands
Duration: 21 Jun 201822 Jun 2018
http://www.cpt18.org/

Conference

ConferenceCTP18 - 4th International Symposium on Cone Penetration Testing
CountryNetherlands
CityDelft
Period21/06/1822/06/18
Internet address

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