A modified Delphi process to establish future research priorities in malignant oesophagogastric surgery

, Michael S. J. Wilson (Lead / Corresponding author), Natalie S. Blencowe, Christopher Boyle, Stephen R. Knight, Russell Petty, Ravi S. Vohra, Tim J. Underwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: With rapid advancement in the genomics of oesophagogastric (OG) cancer and raised expectations in clinical outcomes from patients and clinicians alike there is a clear need to determine the current research priorities in OG cancer surgery. The aim of our study was to use a modified Delphi process to determine the research priorities among OG cancer surgeons in the United Kingdom.

Methods: Delphi methodology may be utilised to develop consensus opinion amongst a group of experts. Members of the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland were invited to submit individual research questions via an online survey (phase I). Two rounds of prioritisation by multidisciplinary expert healthcare professionals (phase II and III) were completed to determine a final list of high priority research questions. All questions submitted and subsequently ranked were analysed on an anonymised basis.

Results: In total, 427 questions were submitted in phase I and 75 with an OG cancer focus were taken forward for prioritisation in phase II. Phase III produced a final list of 12 high priority questions with an emphasis on tailored or personalised treatment strategies in OG cancer surgery.

Conclusion: A modified Delphi process produced a list of 12 high priority research questions in OG cancer surgery. Future studies and awards from funding bodies should reflect this consensus list of prioritised questions in the interest of improving patient care and encouraging collaborative research across multiple centres.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalSurgeon: Journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Early online date16 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Dec 2019

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Research
Neoplasms
Genomics
Patient Care
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Delphi process
  • Oesophagogastric cancer
  • Surgery
  • Research priorities

Cite this

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title = "A modified Delphi process to establish future research priorities in malignant oesophagogastric surgery",
abstract = "Background: With rapid advancement in the genomics of oesophagogastric (OG) cancer and raised expectations in clinical outcomes from patients and clinicians alike there is a clear need to determine the current research priorities in OG cancer surgery. The aim of our study was to use a modified Delphi process to determine the research priorities among OG cancer surgeons in the United Kingdom.Methods: Delphi methodology may be utilised to develop consensus opinion amongst a group of experts. Members of the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland were invited to submit individual research questions via an online survey (phase I). Two rounds of prioritisation by multidisciplinary expert healthcare professionals (phase II and III) were completed to determine a final list of high priority research questions. All questions submitted and subsequently ranked were analysed on an anonymised basis.Results: In total, 427 questions were submitted in phase I and 75 with an OG cancer focus were taken forward for prioritisation in phase II. Phase III produced a final list of 12 high priority questions with an emphasis on tailored or personalised treatment strategies in OG cancer surgery.Conclusion: A modified Delphi process produced a list of 12 high priority research questions in OG cancer surgery. Future studies and awards from funding bodies should reflect this consensus list of prioritised questions in the interest of improving patient care and encouraging collaborative research across multiple centres.",
keywords = "Delphi process, Oesophagogastric cancer, Surgery, Research priorities",
author = "Wilson, {Michael S. J.} and Blencowe, {Natalie S.} and Christopher Boyle and Knight, {Stephen R.} and Russell Petty and Vohra, {Ravi S.} and Underwood, {Tim J.}",
note = "No funding. Copyright {\circledC} 2019 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
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A modified Delphi process to establish future research priorities in malignant oesophagogastric surgery. /; Wilson, Michael S. J. (Lead / Corresponding author); Blencowe, Natalie S.; Boyle, Christopher; Knight, Stephen R.; Petty, Russell; Vohra, Ravi S.; Underwood, Tim J.

In: Surgeon: Journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland, 16.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A modified Delphi process to establish future research priorities in malignant oesophagogastric surgery

AU - Wilson, Michael S. J.

AU - Blencowe, Natalie S.

AU - Boyle, Christopher

AU - Knight, Stephen R.

AU - Petty, Russell

AU - Vohra, Ravi S.

AU - Underwood, Tim J.

N1 - No funding. Copyright © 2019 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/12/16

Y1 - 2019/12/16

N2 - Background: With rapid advancement in the genomics of oesophagogastric (OG) cancer and raised expectations in clinical outcomes from patients and clinicians alike there is a clear need to determine the current research priorities in OG cancer surgery. The aim of our study was to use a modified Delphi process to determine the research priorities among OG cancer surgeons in the United Kingdom.Methods: Delphi methodology may be utilised to develop consensus opinion amongst a group of experts. Members of the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland were invited to submit individual research questions via an online survey (phase I). Two rounds of prioritisation by multidisciplinary expert healthcare professionals (phase II and III) were completed to determine a final list of high priority research questions. All questions submitted and subsequently ranked were analysed on an anonymised basis.Results: In total, 427 questions were submitted in phase I and 75 with an OG cancer focus were taken forward for prioritisation in phase II. Phase III produced a final list of 12 high priority questions with an emphasis on tailored or personalised treatment strategies in OG cancer surgery.Conclusion: A modified Delphi process produced a list of 12 high priority research questions in OG cancer surgery. Future studies and awards from funding bodies should reflect this consensus list of prioritised questions in the interest of improving patient care and encouraging collaborative research across multiple centres.

AB - Background: With rapid advancement in the genomics of oesophagogastric (OG) cancer and raised expectations in clinical outcomes from patients and clinicians alike there is a clear need to determine the current research priorities in OG cancer surgery. The aim of our study was to use a modified Delphi process to determine the research priorities among OG cancer surgeons in the United Kingdom.Methods: Delphi methodology may be utilised to develop consensus opinion amongst a group of experts. Members of the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland were invited to submit individual research questions via an online survey (phase I). Two rounds of prioritisation by multidisciplinary expert healthcare professionals (phase II and III) were completed to determine a final list of high priority research questions. All questions submitted and subsequently ranked were analysed on an anonymised basis.Results: In total, 427 questions were submitted in phase I and 75 with an OG cancer focus were taken forward for prioritisation in phase II. Phase III produced a final list of 12 high priority questions with an emphasis on tailored or personalised treatment strategies in OG cancer surgery.Conclusion: A modified Delphi process produced a list of 12 high priority research questions in OG cancer surgery. Future studies and awards from funding bodies should reflect this consensus list of prioritised questions in the interest of improving patient care and encouraging collaborative research across multiple centres.

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KW - Oesophagogastric cancer

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JF - Surgeon: Journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland

SN - 1479-666X

ER -