A Modular Tray Growth System for Barley

Mikel Arrieta (Lead / Corresponding author), Isabelle Colas, Malcolm Macaulay, Robbie Waugh, Luke Ramsay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

Determining when a barley plant starts and finishes meiosis is not trivial as when the spikelets undergo meiosis, the spike is not visible as it is still well within the leaf sheath on the developing tiller. This is a general constraint for any experiment involving meiosis, such as cytology, RNA extractions, or abiotic stress treatments aiming to target such a developmental stage. The lack of synchronicity between barley tillers within the same plant exacerbates the difficulty to determine the overall meiotic stage of a plant at a certain time.Given the lack of a nondestructive staging system for predicting the entry into meiosis and the problems of working with large pot plant systems, a modular plant growing is proposed. This system enables the growth of a high number of plants in a small surface, each producing a single tiller. The modular tray system was used to generate a nondestructive prediction tool for meiosis by using external morphological features. As an example, the system is used here for heat treating F1 plants in early meiosis stages to modify recombination.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPlant Meiosis
Subtitle of host publicationMethods and Protocols
EditorsMónica Pradillo, Stefan Heckmann
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherHumana Press
Pages367-379
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781493998180
ISBN (Print)9781493998173
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Volume2061
ISSN (Print)1064-3745
ISSN (Electronic)1940-6029

Fingerprint

Hordeum
Meiosis
Growth
Genetic Recombination
Cell Biology
Hot Temperature
RNA

Keywords

  • Barley
  • Heat shock
  • High-throughput
  • Meiosis
  • Modular tray system
  • Nondestructive
  • Prediction
  • Staging
  • Temperature

Cite this

Arrieta, M., Colas, I., Macaulay, M., Waugh, R., & Ramsay, L. (2020). A Modular Tray Growth System for Barley. In M. Pradillo, & S. Heckmann (Eds.), Plant Meiosis: Methods and Protocols (pp. 367-379). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 2061). New York: Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-9818-0_26
Arrieta, Mikel ; Colas, Isabelle ; Macaulay, Malcolm ; Waugh, Robbie ; Ramsay, Luke. / A Modular Tray Growth System for Barley. Plant Meiosis: Methods and Protocols. editor / Mónica Pradillo ; Stefan Heckmann. New York : Humana Press, 2020. pp. 367-379 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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Arrieta, M, Colas, I, Macaulay, M, Waugh, R & Ramsay, L 2020, A Modular Tray Growth System for Barley. in M Pradillo & S Heckmann (eds), Plant Meiosis: Methods and Protocols. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 2061, Humana Press, New York, pp. 367-379. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-9818-0_26

A Modular Tray Growth System for Barley. / Arrieta, Mikel (Lead / Corresponding author); Colas, Isabelle; Macaulay, Malcolm; Waugh, Robbie; Ramsay, Luke.

Plant Meiosis: Methods and Protocols. ed. / Mónica Pradillo; Stefan Heckmann. New York : Humana Press, 2020. p. 367-379 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 2061).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Arrieta M, Colas I, Macaulay M, Waugh R, Ramsay L. A Modular Tray Growth System for Barley. In Pradillo M, Heckmann S, editors, Plant Meiosis: Methods and Protocols. New York: Humana Press. 2020. p. 367-379. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-9818-0_26