A randomised phase 2a study to investigate the effects of blocking interleukin-33 with tozorakimab in patients hospitalised with COVID-19: Accord-2

Tom Wilkinson (Lead / Corresponding author), Anthony De Soyza, Miles Carroll, James D. Chalmers, Michael G. Crooks, Gareth Griffiths, Manu Shankar-Hari, Ling-Pei Ho, Alex Horsley, Chris Kell, Beatriz Lara, Biswa Mishra, Rachel Moate, Clive Page, Hitesh Pandya, Jason Raw, Fred Reid, Dinesh Saralaya, Ian C. Scott, Salman SiddiquiAndy Ustianowski, Natalie van Zuydam, Ashley Woodcock, Dave Singh

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Abstract

Background: Increased serum interleukin (IL)-33 predicts poor outcomes in patients hospitalised with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We examined the efficacy and safety of tozorakimab, a monoclonal antibody that neutralises IL-33, in improving outcomes in ACCORD-2 (EudraCT: 2020-001736-95).

Methods: ACCORD-2 was an open-label, phase 2a study in adults hospitalised with COVID-19. Patients were randomised 1:1 to tozorakimab 300 mg plus standard of care (SoC) or SoC alone. The primary end-point was time to clinical response (sustained clinical improvement of ≥2 points on the World Health Organization ordinal scale, discharge from hospital or fit for discharge) by day 29. Other end-points included death or respiratory failure, mortality and intensive care unit admission by day 29, and safety. Serum IL-33/soluble stimulated-2 (sST2) complex levels were measured by high-sensitivity immunoassay.

Results: Efficacy analyses included 97 patients (tozorakimab+SoC, n=53; SoC, n=44). Median time to clinical response did not differ between the tozorakimab and SoC arms (8.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; HR 0.96, 80% CI 0.70-1.31; one-sided p=0.33). Tozorakimab was well tolerated and the OR for risk of death or respiratory failure with treatment versus SoC was 0.55 (80% CI 0.27-1.12; p=0.26), while the OR was 0.31 (80% CI 0.09-1.06) in patents with high baseline serum IL-33/sST2 complex levels.

Conclusions: Overall, ACCORD-2 results suggest that tozorakimab could be a novel therapy for patients hospitalised with COVID-19, warranting further investigation in confirmatory phase 3 studies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number00249-2023
Number of pages13
JournalERJ Open Research
Volume9
Issue number5
Early online date9 Aug 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2023

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