A revolutionary career? François de Neufchâteau does well by doing good, 1774-1794

James Livesey (Lead / Corresponding author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Why did members of the eighteenth-century French service elite become revolutionaries? This article argues that François de Neufchâteau's adherence to the Revolution is best understood as a career development, that the institution that related his public and private selves was the career. To understand how a career could propel an individual, and by extension a generation, in such an idiosyncratic direction, we need to interrogate our understanding of the idea of a career. The career was a development from the religious idea of the vocation or calling. It was a means of making individual self-assertion morally understandable and socially useful. Through an analysis of his reactions to public and private crisis the article reconstructs François de Neufchâteau's understanding of his vocation as a public man. The career of François de Neufchâteau offers a good example of how the themes of cultural and social history can be united in the study of the Revolution.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)173-195
    Number of pages23
    JournalFrench History
    Volume18
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2004

    Fingerprint

    Revolution
    Vocation
    Cultural History
    Social History
    Elites
    Religion
    Career Development
    Adherence

    Cite this

    @article{675e4b6d6a7945b78f14f467100e655a,
    title = "A revolutionary career? Fran{\cc}ois de Neufch{\^a}teau does well by doing good, 1774-1794",
    abstract = "Why did members of the eighteenth-century French service elite become revolutionaries? This article argues that Fran{\cc}ois de Neufch{\^a}teau's adherence to the Revolution is best understood as a career development, that the institution that related his public and private selves was the career. To understand how a career could propel an individual, and by extension a generation, in such an idiosyncratic direction, we need to interrogate our understanding of the idea of a career. The career was a development from the religious idea of the vocation or calling. It was a means of making individual self-assertion morally understandable and socially useful. Through an analysis of his reactions to public and private crisis the article reconstructs Fran{\cc}ois de Neufch{\^a}teau's understanding of his vocation as a public man. The career of Fran{\cc}ois de Neufch{\^a}teau offers a good example of how the themes of cultural and social history can be united in the study of the Revolution.",
    author = "James Livesey",
    year = "2004",
    month = "6",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1093/fh/18.2.173",
    language = "English",
    volume = "18",
    pages = "173--195",
    journal = "French History",
    issn = "0269-1191",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
    number = "2",

    }

    A revolutionary career? François de Neufchâteau does well by doing good, 1774-1794. / Livesey, James (Lead / Corresponding author).

    In: French History, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.06.2004, p. 173-195.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A revolutionary career? François de Neufchâteau does well by doing good, 1774-1794

    AU - Livesey, James

    PY - 2004/6/1

    Y1 - 2004/6/1

    N2 - Why did members of the eighteenth-century French service elite become revolutionaries? This article argues that François de Neufchâteau's adherence to the Revolution is best understood as a career development, that the institution that related his public and private selves was the career. To understand how a career could propel an individual, and by extension a generation, in such an idiosyncratic direction, we need to interrogate our understanding of the idea of a career. The career was a development from the religious idea of the vocation or calling. It was a means of making individual self-assertion morally understandable and socially useful. Through an analysis of his reactions to public and private crisis the article reconstructs François de Neufchâteau's understanding of his vocation as a public man. The career of François de Neufchâteau offers a good example of how the themes of cultural and social history can be united in the study of the Revolution.

    AB - Why did members of the eighteenth-century French service elite become revolutionaries? This article argues that François de Neufchâteau's adherence to the Revolution is best understood as a career development, that the institution that related his public and private selves was the career. To understand how a career could propel an individual, and by extension a generation, in such an idiosyncratic direction, we need to interrogate our understanding of the idea of a career. The career was a development from the religious idea of the vocation or calling. It was a means of making individual self-assertion morally understandable and socially useful. Through an analysis of his reactions to public and private crisis the article reconstructs François de Neufchâteau's understanding of his vocation as a public man. The career of François de Neufchâteau offers a good example of how the themes of cultural and social history can be united in the study of the Revolution.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=60950375728&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1093/fh/18.2.173

    DO - 10.1093/fh/18.2.173

    M3 - Review article

    VL - 18

    SP - 173

    EP - 195

    JO - French History

    JF - French History

    SN - 0269-1191

    IS - 2

    ER -