A social network perspective on the affect, behaviour and cognition of international and host-national students

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    While internationalisation in higher education has become increasingly common, research and the various chapters of internationalisation experiences across the globe in this book indicate that international students continue to face a number of challenges while studying abroad (De Vita, 2001; Kondakci, Broeck, and Yildirim, 2008; Rienties, Heliot, and Jindal-Snape, 2013; Zhou, JindalSnape, Topping, and Todman, 2008). In Chapter 1, we argue that international students experience triple transitions: moving to a new country, moving to a new educational system, and moving to higher educational degree programmes. Within these triple transitions, international students experience differences in the social and organisational cultures, dealing with daily life issues, languages, and academic and interpersonal expectations and realities (Jindal-Snape and Ingram, 2013; Rienties, Beausaert, Grohnert, Niemantsverdriet, and Kommers, 2012; Rienties, Hernández-Nanclares, Jindal-Snape, and Alcott, 2013). Research suggests that any mismatch between expectations and realities, for instance, can be stressful (Zhou, Topping, and Jindal-Snape, 2011).
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationMulti-dimensional Transitions of International Students to Higher Education
    EditorsDivya Jindal-Snape, Bart Rienties
    Place of PublicationLondon
    PublisherTaylor & Francis
    Chapter4
    Pages53-70
    Number of pages18
    Edition1
    ISBN (Electronic)9781317396475
    ISBN (Print)9781138890916 (hbk), 9781138890909 (pbk)
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

    Publication series

    NameNew Perspectives on Learning and Instruction

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General Social Sciences

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