A tell tail sign: A conserved C-terminal tail-anchor domain targets a subset of pathogen effectors to the plant endoplasmic reticulum

Emily Breeze (Lead / Corresponding author), Victoria Vale, Hazel McLellan, Yann Pecrix, Laurence Godiard, Murray Grant, Lorenzo Frigerio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the entry point to the secretory pathway and, as such, is critical for adaptive responses to biotic stress, when the demand for de novo synthesis of immunity-related proteins and signalling components increases significantly. Successful phytopathogens have evolved an arsenal of small effector proteins which collectively reconfigure multiple host components and signalling pathways to promote virulence; a small, but important, subset of which are targeted to the endomembrane system including the ER. We identified and validated a conserved C-terminal tail-anchor motif in a set of pathogen effectors known to localize to the ER from the oomycetes Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and Plasmopara halstedii (downy mildew of Arabidopsis and sunflower, respectively) and used this protein topology to develop a bioinformatic pipeline to identify putative ER-localised effectors within the effectorome of the related oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight. Many of the identified P. infestans tail-anchor effectors converged on ER-localised NAC transcription factors, suggesting this family is a critical host target for multiple pathogens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3188–3202
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume74
Issue number10
Early online date1 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 May 2023

Keywords

  • Endomembrane
  • endoplasmic reticulum (ER)
  • oomycete effectors
  • NAC with Transmembrane Motif1-like (NTL)
  • Phytophthora infestans
  • tail anchor

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