Absence of curli in soil-persistent Escherichia coli is mediated by a C-di-GMP signaling defect and suggests evidence of biofilm-independent niche specialization

Yinka M. Somorin, Tara Vollmerhausen, Nicholas Waters, Leighton Pritchard, Florence Abram, Fiona Brennan, Conor O'Byrne (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Escherichia coli is commonly viewed as a gastrointestinal commensal or pathogen although an increasing body of evidence suggests that it can persist in non-host environments as well. Curli are a major component of biofilm in many enteric bacteria including E. coli and are important for adherence to different biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this study we investigated curli production in a unique collection of soil-persistent E. coli isolates and examined the role of curli formation in environmental persistence. Although most soil-persistent E. coli were curli-positive, 10% of isolates were curli-negative (17 out of 170). Curli-producing E. coli (COB583, COB585, and BW25113) displayed significantly more attachment to quartz sand than the curli-negative strains. Long-term soil survival experiments indicated that curli production was not required for long-term survival in live soil (over 110 days), as a curli-negative mutant BW25113ΔcsgB had similar survival compared to wild type BW25113. Mutations in two genes associated with c-di-GMP metabolism, dgcE and pdeR, correlated with loss of curli in eight soil-persistent strains, although this did not significantly impair their survival in soil compared to curli-positive strains. Overall, the data indicate that curli-deficient and biofilm-defective strains, that also have a defect in attachment to quartz sand, are able to reside in soil for long periods of time thus pointing to the possibility that niches may exist in the soil that can support long-term survival independently of biofilm formation.

LanguageEnglish
Article number1340
Pages1-13
Number of pages13
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Biofilms
Soil
Escherichia coli
Quartz
Enterobacteriaceae
Mutation
Genes

Keywords

  • Biofilm
  • C-di-GMP
  • Curli
  • Escherichia coli
  • RpoS
  • Soil

Cite this

Somorin, Yinka M. ; Vollmerhausen, Tara ; Waters, Nicholas ; Pritchard, Leighton ; Abram, Florence ; Brennan, Fiona ; O'Byrne, Conor. / Absence of curli in soil-persistent Escherichia coli is mediated by a C-di-GMP signaling defect and suggests evidence of biofilm-independent niche specialization. In: Frontiers in Microbiology. 2018 ; Vol. 9. pp. 1-13.
@article{cf7c47386d6e43bea06a6026d5843e80,
title = "Absence of curli in soil-persistent Escherichia coli is mediated by a C-di-GMP signaling defect and suggests evidence of biofilm-independent niche specialization",
abstract = "Escherichia coli is commonly viewed as a gastrointestinal commensal or pathogen although an increasing body of evidence suggests that it can persist in non-host environments as well. Curli are a major component of biofilm in many enteric bacteria including E. coli and are important for adherence to different biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this study we investigated curli production in a unique collection of soil-persistent E. coli isolates and examined the role of curli formation in environmental persistence. Although most soil-persistent E. coli were curli-positive, 10{\%} of isolates were curli-negative (17 out of 170). Curli-producing E. coli (COB583, COB585, and BW25113) displayed significantly more attachment to quartz sand than the curli-negative strains. Long-term soil survival experiments indicated that curli production was not required for long-term survival in live soil (over 110 days), as a curli-negative mutant BW25113ΔcsgB had similar survival compared to wild type BW25113. Mutations in two genes associated with c-di-GMP metabolism, dgcE and pdeR, correlated with loss of curli in eight soil-persistent strains, although this did not significantly impair their survival in soil compared to curli-positive strains. Overall, the data indicate that curli-deficient and biofilm-defective strains, that also have a defect in attachment to quartz sand, are able to reside in soil for long periods of time thus pointing to the possibility that niches may exist in the soil that can support long-term survival independently of biofilm formation.",
keywords = "Biofilm, C-di-GMP, Curli, Escherichia coli, RpoS, Soil",
author = "Somorin, {Yinka M.} and Tara Vollmerhausen and Nicholas Waters and Leighton Pritchard and Florence Abram and Fiona Brennan and Conor O'Byrne",
note = "This work was supported by an NUI Galway College of Science PhD Fellowship and Thomas Crawford Hayes Research awards to YS.",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "22",
doi = "10.3389/fmicb.2018.01340",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "Frontiers in Microbiology",
issn = "1664-302X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media",

}

Absence of curli in soil-persistent Escherichia coli is mediated by a C-di-GMP signaling defect and suggests evidence of biofilm-independent niche specialization. / Somorin, Yinka M.; Vollmerhausen, Tara; Waters, Nicholas; Pritchard, Leighton; Abram, Florence; Brennan, Fiona; O'Byrne, Conor (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Frontiers in Microbiology, Vol. 9, 1340, 22.06.2018, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Absence of curli in soil-persistent Escherichia coli is mediated by a C-di-GMP signaling defect and suggests evidence of biofilm-independent niche specialization

AU - Somorin, Yinka M.

AU - Vollmerhausen, Tara

AU - Waters, Nicholas

AU - Pritchard, Leighton

AU - Abram, Florence

AU - Brennan, Fiona

AU - O'Byrne, Conor

N1 - This work was supported by an NUI Galway College of Science PhD Fellowship and Thomas Crawford Hayes Research awards to YS.

PY - 2018/6/22

Y1 - 2018/6/22

N2 - Escherichia coli is commonly viewed as a gastrointestinal commensal or pathogen although an increasing body of evidence suggests that it can persist in non-host environments as well. Curli are a major component of biofilm in many enteric bacteria including E. coli and are important for adherence to different biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this study we investigated curli production in a unique collection of soil-persistent E. coli isolates and examined the role of curli formation in environmental persistence. Although most soil-persistent E. coli were curli-positive, 10% of isolates were curli-negative (17 out of 170). Curli-producing E. coli (COB583, COB585, and BW25113) displayed significantly more attachment to quartz sand than the curli-negative strains. Long-term soil survival experiments indicated that curli production was not required for long-term survival in live soil (over 110 days), as a curli-negative mutant BW25113ΔcsgB had similar survival compared to wild type BW25113. Mutations in two genes associated with c-di-GMP metabolism, dgcE and pdeR, correlated with loss of curli in eight soil-persistent strains, although this did not significantly impair their survival in soil compared to curli-positive strains. Overall, the data indicate that curli-deficient and biofilm-defective strains, that also have a defect in attachment to quartz sand, are able to reside in soil for long periods of time thus pointing to the possibility that niches may exist in the soil that can support long-term survival independently of biofilm formation.

AB - Escherichia coli is commonly viewed as a gastrointestinal commensal or pathogen although an increasing body of evidence suggests that it can persist in non-host environments as well. Curli are a major component of biofilm in many enteric bacteria including E. coli and are important for adherence to different biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this study we investigated curli production in a unique collection of soil-persistent E. coli isolates and examined the role of curli formation in environmental persistence. Although most soil-persistent E. coli were curli-positive, 10% of isolates were curli-negative (17 out of 170). Curli-producing E. coli (COB583, COB585, and BW25113) displayed significantly more attachment to quartz sand than the curli-negative strains. Long-term soil survival experiments indicated that curli production was not required for long-term survival in live soil (over 110 days), as a curli-negative mutant BW25113ΔcsgB had similar survival compared to wild type BW25113. Mutations in two genes associated with c-di-GMP metabolism, dgcE and pdeR, correlated with loss of curli in eight soil-persistent strains, although this did not significantly impair their survival in soil compared to curli-positive strains. Overall, the data indicate that curli-deficient and biofilm-defective strains, that also have a defect in attachment to quartz sand, are able to reside in soil for long periods of time thus pointing to the possibility that niches may exist in the soil that can support long-term survival independently of biofilm formation.

KW - Biofilm

KW - C-di-GMP

KW - Curli

KW - Escherichia coli

KW - RpoS

KW - Soil

U2 - 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01340

DO - 10.3389/fmicb.2018.01340

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Frontiers in Microbiology

T2 - Frontiers in Microbiology

JF - Frontiers in Microbiology

SN - 1664-302X

M1 - 1340

ER -