Abstract Video: net.video.abstraction

Tilman Baumgärtel, Sarah Cook, Charlotte Frost, Caitlin Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

The book covers the history of video looking both back towards film and forwards towards new media art. It considers the idea of abstract video as a way of pointing to the moment after the year 2000 when moving image artworks were made after the near extinction of analog video and before the dominance of digitally produced imagery. The chapter is a conversation between four curator/historians who deal with the digital or new media art and art online specifically in which each bring an example - including work by Thomson&Craighead, Vuk Cosic, Rosa Menkman and Lorna Mills. Questions of the site of access to the moving image work - from websites to downloads - and its familiar forms (webcams, gifs) are addressed. The book includes contributions on Transmission, Interference and Reception by authors including Michael Connor, Katja Kwastek, and John G Hanhardt.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAbstract Video
Subtitle of host publicationThe Moving Image in Contemporary Art
EditorsGabrielle Jennings, Kate Mondloch
Place of PublicationOakland, CA
PublisherUniversity of California Press
Pages129-145
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9780520958135
ISBN (Print)9780520282476, 9780520282483
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

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  • Cite this

    Baumgärtel, T., Cook, S., Frost, C., & Jones, C. (2015). Abstract Video: net.video.abstraction. In G. Jennings, & K. Mondloch (Eds.), Abstract Video: The Moving Image in Contemporary Art (pp. 129-145). University of California Press.