Access to and waiting time for psychiatrist services in a Canadian urban area

A study in real time

Elliot M. Goldner (Lead / Corresponding author), Wayne Jones, Mei Lan Fang

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To obtain improved quality information regarding psychiatrist waiting times by use of a novel methodological approach in which accessibility and wait times are determined by a real-time patient referral procedure. Method: An adult male patient with depression was referred for psychiatric assessment by a family physician. Consecutive calls were made to all registered psychiatrists (n = 297) in Vancouver. A semistructured call procedure was used to collect information about the psychiatrists' availability for receipt of this and similar referrals, identify factors that affect psychiatrist accessibility, and determine the availability of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Results: Efforts were made to contact 297 psychiatrists and 230 (77%) were reached successfully. Among the 230 psychiatrists contacted, 160 (70%) indicated that they were unable to accept the referral. Although 70 (30%) indicated that they might be able to consider accepting a referral, 64 (91% of those who would consider accepting the referral) indicated that they would need to review detailed, written referral information and could not provide estimates of the length of wait times if the patient was to be accepted. Only 6 (3% of the 230 psychiatrists contacted) offered immediate appointment times and their wait times ranged from 4 to 55 days. When asked whether they could provide CBT, most (56%) psychiatrists in clinical practice answered maybe. Conclusions: Substantial barriers exist for family physicians attempting to refer patients for psychiatric referral. Consolidated efforts to improve access to psychiatric assessment are needed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)474-480
    Number of pages7
    JournalCanadian Journal of Psychiatry
    Volume56
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

    Fingerprint

    Psychiatry
    Referral and Consultation
    Family Physicians
    Cognitive Therapy
    Appointments and Schedules
    Depression

    Keywords

    • Canada
    • Mental health care
    • Policy
    • Practice
    • Psychiatry
    • Treatment access
    • Wait times

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Objective: To obtain improved quality information regarding psychiatrist waiting times by use of a novel methodological approach in which accessibility and wait times are determined by a real-time patient referral procedure. Method: An adult male patient with depression was referred for psychiatric assessment by a family physician. Consecutive calls were made to all registered psychiatrists (n = 297) in Vancouver. A semistructured call procedure was used to collect information about the psychiatrists' availability for receipt of this and similar referrals, identify factors that affect psychiatrist accessibility, and determine the availability of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Results: Efforts were made to contact 297 psychiatrists and 230 (77{\%}) were reached successfully. Among the 230 psychiatrists contacted, 160 (70{\%}) indicated that they were unable to accept the referral. Although 70 (30{\%}) indicated that they might be able to consider accepting a referral, 64 (91{\%} of those who would consider accepting the referral) indicated that they would need to review detailed, written referral information and could not provide estimates of the length of wait times if the patient was to be accepted. Only 6 (3{\%} of the 230 psychiatrists contacted) offered immediate appointment times and their wait times ranged from 4 to 55 days. When asked whether they could provide CBT, most (56{\%}) psychiatrists in clinical practice answered maybe. Conclusions: Substantial barriers exist for family physicians attempting to refer patients for psychiatric referral. Consolidated efforts to improve access to psychiatric assessment are needed.",
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    Access to and waiting time for psychiatrist services in a Canadian urban area : A study in real time. / Goldner, Elliot M. (Lead / Corresponding author); Jones, Wayne; Fang, Mei Lan.

    In: Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 56, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 474-480.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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