Accessing addiction recovery capital via online and offline channels: The role of peer-support and shared experiences of addiction

Ana-Maria Bliuc, David Best, Ahmed Moustafa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

Consistent and stable access to support after exiting addiction treatment programs is key in achieving positive recovery outcomes on the long-term. High-quality support in the crucial post-treatment stage was shown to be associated to recovery capital building, which in turn predicts positive rediscovery outcomes including increased wellbeing and a drug non-using, healthier lifestyle. In this chapter, we discuss various pathways to accessing this support with a focus on approaches based on peer-support in both offline and online contexts. Building on the Social Identity Model of Recovery (SIMOR, Best et al., 2016), and based on our recent research on the role of online communities of recovery, we propose that a positive identity change which is aligned to values, attitudes, and behaviors of supportive (non-using) groups can be achieved through engagement in pro-recovery communities online and offline. Engagement with online communities can constitute an effective and sustainable pathway to recovery in particular for populations that would normally limit of fully avoid participation in standard (offline) recovery support services.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCognitive, Clinical, and Neural Aspects of Drug Addiction
EditorsAhmed Moustafa
PublisherElsevier
Chapter12
Pages251-265
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)9780128169797
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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Keywords

  • Recovery capital
  • Peer-support
  • Online communities of recovery
  • Treatment
  • Recovery social identity

Cite this

Bliuc, A-M., Best, D., & Moustafa , A. (2020). Accessing addiction recovery capital via online and offline channels: The role of peer-support and shared experiences of addiction. In A. Moustafa (Ed.), Cognitive, Clinical, and Neural Aspects of Drug Addiction (pp. 251-265). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-816979-7.00012-1