ACE inhibitors, statins and thiazides

no association with change in grip strength among community dwelling older men and women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study

Miles D. Witham (Lead / Corresponding author), Holly E. Syddall, Elaine Dennison, Cyrus Cooper, Marion E. T. McMurdo, Avan Aihie Sayer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: vascular disease has been postulated to contribute to muscle dysfunction in old age. Previous studies examining the effects of cardiovascular drugs on muscle function have shown conflicting results. We therefore examined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, thiazide and statin use with decline in grip strength in a well-characterised cohort.
    Methods: we analysed prospectively collected data from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS). For each medication, participants were divided into no baseline use/no use at follow-up, baseline use/no use at follow-up, no baseline use but use at follow-up and use at baseline and follow-up. For each group, annualised decline in grip strength (kg per year) was calculated, then adjusted for baseline age, height, weight, baseline grip strength, indices of ischaemic heart disease and hypertension. Analyses were conducted separately for males and females.
    Results: 639 participants were included in the analysis, mean age 65 years. 321 (50%) were male; mean follow-up time was 4.4 years. There were no differences in baseline grip between baseline users and non-users of any drug class. Adjusted grip strength change per year was similar for each group of ACE inhibitor use (P > 0.05). Similar analyses revealed no significant between-group differences for statin or thiazide use. Analysis of dropout rates by medication use revealed no evidence of selection bias.
    Conclusion: use of ACE inhibitors, statins or thiazides was not associated with differences in grip strength decline in healthy older people in the HCS.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberafu008
    Pages (from-to)661-666
    Number of pages6
    JournalAge and Ageing
    Volume43
    Issue number5
    Early online date11 Feb 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

    Fingerprint

    Thiazides
    Independent Living
    Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
    Hand Strength
    Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
    Cohort Studies
    Cardiovascular Agents
    Muscles
    Selection Bias
    Vascular Diseases
    Myocardial Ischemia
    Hypertension
    Weights and Measures
    Pharmaceutical Preparations

    Keywords

    • ACE inhibitors
    • Aged
    • Epidemiology
    • Grip strength
    • Older people

    Cite this

    @article{72ca9b973162453a9b8b972fd5aeda10,
    title = "ACE inhibitors, statins and thiazides: no association with change in grip strength among community dwelling older men and women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study",
    abstract = "Background: vascular disease has been postulated to contribute to muscle dysfunction in old age. Previous studies examining the effects of cardiovascular drugs on muscle function have shown conflicting results. We therefore examined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, thiazide and statin use with decline in grip strength in a well-characterised cohort. Methods: we analysed prospectively collected data from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS). For each medication, participants were divided into no baseline use/no use at follow-up, baseline use/no use at follow-up, no baseline use but use at follow-up and use at baseline and follow-up. For each group, annualised decline in grip strength (kg per year) was calculated, then adjusted for baseline age, height, weight, baseline grip strength, indices of ischaemic heart disease and hypertension. Analyses were conducted separately for males and females. Results: 639 participants were included in the analysis, mean age 65 years. 321 (50{\%}) were male; mean follow-up time was 4.4 years. There were no differences in baseline grip between baseline users and non-users of any drug class. Adjusted grip strength change per year was similar for each group of ACE inhibitor use (P > 0.05). Similar analyses revealed no significant between-group differences for statin or thiazide use. Analysis of dropout rates by medication use revealed no evidence of selection bias. Conclusion: use of ACE inhibitors, statins or thiazides was not associated with differences in grip strength decline in healthy older people in the HCS.",
    keywords = "ACE inhibitors, Aged, Epidemiology, Grip strength, Older people",
    author = "Witham, {Miles D.} and Syddall, {Holly E.} and Elaine Dennison and Cyrus Cooper and McMurdo, {Marion E. T.} and Sayer, {Avan Aihie}",
    year = "2014",
    month = "9",
    doi = "10.1093/ageing/afu008",
    language = "English",
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    issn = "0002-0729",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
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    }

    ACE inhibitors, statins and thiazides : no association with change in grip strength among community dwelling older men and women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study. / Witham, Miles D. (Lead / Corresponding author); Syddall, Holly E.; Dennison, Elaine; Cooper, Cyrus; McMurdo, Marion E. T.; Sayer, Avan Aihie.

    In: Age and Ageing, Vol. 43, No. 5, afu008, 09.2014, p. 661-666.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - ACE inhibitors, statins and thiazides

    T2 - no association with change in grip strength among community dwelling older men and women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study

    AU - Witham, Miles D.

    AU - Syddall, Holly E.

    AU - Dennison, Elaine

    AU - Cooper, Cyrus

    AU - McMurdo, Marion E. T.

    AU - Sayer, Avan Aihie

    PY - 2014/9

    Y1 - 2014/9

    N2 - Background: vascular disease has been postulated to contribute to muscle dysfunction in old age. Previous studies examining the effects of cardiovascular drugs on muscle function have shown conflicting results. We therefore examined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, thiazide and statin use with decline in grip strength in a well-characterised cohort. Methods: we analysed prospectively collected data from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS). For each medication, participants were divided into no baseline use/no use at follow-up, baseline use/no use at follow-up, no baseline use but use at follow-up and use at baseline and follow-up. For each group, annualised decline in grip strength (kg per year) was calculated, then adjusted for baseline age, height, weight, baseline grip strength, indices of ischaemic heart disease and hypertension. Analyses were conducted separately for males and females. Results: 639 participants were included in the analysis, mean age 65 years. 321 (50%) were male; mean follow-up time was 4.4 years. There were no differences in baseline grip between baseline users and non-users of any drug class. Adjusted grip strength change per year was similar for each group of ACE inhibitor use (P > 0.05). Similar analyses revealed no significant between-group differences for statin or thiazide use. Analysis of dropout rates by medication use revealed no evidence of selection bias. Conclusion: use of ACE inhibitors, statins or thiazides was not associated with differences in grip strength decline in healthy older people in the HCS.

    AB - Background: vascular disease has been postulated to contribute to muscle dysfunction in old age. Previous studies examining the effects of cardiovascular drugs on muscle function have shown conflicting results. We therefore examined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, thiazide and statin use with decline in grip strength in a well-characterised cohort. Methods: we analysed prospectively collected data from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS). For each medication, participants were divided into no baseline use/no use at follow-up, baseline use/no use at follow-up, no baseline use but use at follow-up and use at baseline and follow-up. For each group, annualised decline in grip strength (kg per year) was calculated, then adjusted for baseline age, height, weight, baseline grip strength, indices of ischaemic heart disease and hypertension. Analyses were conducted separately for males and females. Results: 639 participants were included in the analysis, mean age 65 years. 321 (50%) were male; mean follow-up time was 4.4 years. There were no differences in baseline grip between baseline users and non-users of any drug class. Adjusted grip strength change per year was similar for each group of ACE inhibitor use (P > 0.05). Similar analyses revealed no significant between-group differences for statin or thiazide use. Analysis of dropout rates by medication use revealed no evidence of selection bias. Conclusion: use of ACE inhibitors, statins or thiazides was not associated with differences in grip strength decline in healthy older people in the HCS.

    KW - ACE inhibitors

    KW - Aged

    KW - Epidemiology

    KW - Grip strength

    KW - Older people

    U2 - 10.1093/ageing/afu008

    DO - 10.1093/ageing/afu008

    M3 - Article

    VL - 43

    SP - 661

    EP - 666

    JO - Age and Ageing

    JF - Age and Ageing

    SN - 0002-0729

    IS - 5

    M1 - afu008

    ER -