Addressing children's oral health inequalities in Northern Ireland: A research-practice-community partnership initiative

Ruth Freeman (Lead / Corresponding author), Michele Oliver, Grace Bunting, Julia Kirk, Wendy Saunderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 13 Citations

Abstract

Objective. Northern Ireland has a high prevalence of childhood dental caries, reflecting heavy consumption of cariogenic snack foods. To develop a policy to promote and facilitate healthier eating, researchers, practitioners, and the school community formed a partnership, together creating the Boost Better Breaks (BBB) school-based policy. The policy was developed with and supported by dieticians, health promotion officers, teachers, school meal advisors, and local suppliers of school milk. Eighty percent of primary schools and preschool groups within the Southern Health and Social Services Board are involved in the program, which permits the consumption of only milk and fruit at break time. Methods. The authors assessed the effectiveness of the partnership using data from its first two years. Results. Results of the first two years of evaluation are positive. Initial findings indicate that the program had a positive effect in increasing the mean number of sound teeth in children attending schools in areas in which socioeconomic conditions are poor. Conclusion. This initiative suggests that collaboration can facilitate improvement in children's dental health and that careful targeting of the policy to schools in poor areas has the potential to narrow disparities.

LanguageEnglish
Pages617-625
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health Reports
Volume116
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2001

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Partnership Practice
Northern Ireland
Oral Health
Research
Tooth
Milk
Snacks
Nutritionists
Dental Caries
Health Promotion
Social Work
Health Services
Meals
Child Health
Fruit
Research Personnel

Cite this

Freeman, Ruth ; Oliver, Michele ; Bunting, Grace ; Kirk, Julia ; Saunderson, Wendy. / Addressing children's oral health inequalities in Northern Ireland : A research-practice-community partnership initiative. In: Public Health Reports. 2001 ; Vol. 116, No. 6. pp. 617-625.
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Addressing children's oral health inequalities in Northern Ireland : A research-practice-community partnership initiative. / Freeman, Ruth (Lead / Corresponding author); Oliver, Michele; Bunting, Grace; Kirk, Julia; Saunderson, Wendy.

In: Public Health Reports, Vol. 116, No. 6, 01.11.2001, p. 617-625.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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