Alkali-silica reaction of concrete containing glass: interaction with reactive aggregates

R.K. Dhir, T.D. Dyer, M.C. Tang

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contribution

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In many areas, quantities of recovered glass remain after recycling, for which alternative uses must be found. One possible alternative outlet is the use of glass in concrete. The main concern is that glass is capable of undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR). However, the material also contains significant quantities of sodium. If released, this sodium may contribute to further reaction of glass and / or other reactive aggregates. This paper reports on the two-year results of one part of a larger testing programme which examined the expansion of concrete containing combinations of powdered glass and three UK-sourced aggregate combinations known to undergo ASR.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationCement combinations for durable concrete
    Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the International Conference held at the University of Dundee, Scotland UK on 5-7 July 2005
    EditorsRavindra K. Dhir, Thomas A. Harrison, Moray D. Newlands
    PublisherThomas Telford
    Pages651-662
    Number of pages12
    Volume1
    ISBN (Print)0727734016
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    Event2005 International Congress 'Global construction: ultimate concrete opportunities' - Dundee, United Kingdom
    Duration: 5 Jul 20057 Jul 2005

    Conference

    Conference2005 International Congress 'Global construction: ultimate concrete opportunities'
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityDundee
    Period5/07/057/07/05

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    Cite this

    Dhir, R. K., Dyer, T. D., & Tang, M. C. (2005). Alkali-silica reaction of concrete containing glass: interaction with reactive aggregates. In R. K. Dhir, T. A. Harrison, & M. D. Newlands (Eds.), Cement combinations for durable concrete: proceedings of the International Conference held at the University of Dundee, Scotland UK on 5-7 July 2005 (Vol. 1, pp. 651-662). Thomas Telford.