Allergic contact dermatitis in children; has there been a change in allergens?

G. A. Vongyer, C. Green (Lead / Corresponding author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is now recognized as a common relevant diagnosis in children. We reviewed the results of patch tests in children under 16 years of age over the 3-year period January 2009 to December 2011, comparing the results with those in a similar 3-year retrospective study performed in our unit for the period August 1999 to September 2002. In total, there were 137 children (70 girls and 67 boys) aged 3-15 years enrolled. Of these, 28 girls (40%) and 22 boys (32.8%) had a positive reaction to at least one allergen, with nickel sulfate and potassium dichromate being the most common allergens, each having an incidence of 7.2%, in contrast to the 20% incidence of nickel allergy in 1999-2002. The rate of fragrance allergy was unchanged at 5.8%, and rubber allergy incidence was greatly reduced. These results show that allergens may be changing in children, and that patch testing is still a useful test to consider.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)31-34
    Number of pages4
    JournalClinical and Experimental Dermatology
    Volume40
    Issue number1
    Early online date23 Sep 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

    Fingerprint

    Allergic Contact Dermatitis
    Allergens
    Incidence
    Hypersensitivity
    Potassium Dichromate
    Latex Hypersensitivity
    Patch Tests
    Nickel
    Retrospective Studies

    Cite this

    @article{f1dbed31b3be405192e7a161f928473f,
    title = "Allergic contact dermatitis in children; has there been a change in allergens?",
    abstract = "Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is now recognized as a common relevant diagnosis in children. We reviewed the results of patch tests in children under 16 years of age over the 3-year period January 2009 to December 2011, comparing the results with those in a similar 3-year retrospective study performed in our unit for the period August 1999 to September 2002. In total, there were 137 children (70 girls and 67 boys) aged 3-15 years enrolled. Of these, 28 girls (40{\%}) and 22 boys (32.8{\%}) had a positive reaction to at least one allergen, with nickel sulfate and potassium dichromate being the most common allergens, each having an incidence of 7.2{\%}, in contrast to the 20{\%} incidence of nickel allergy in 1999-2002. The rate of fragrance allergy was unchanged at 5.8{\%}, and rubber allergy incidence was greatly reduced. These results show that allergens may be changing in children, and that patch testing is still a useful test to consider.",
    author = "Vongyer, {G. A.} and C. Green",
    note = "{\circledC} 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.",
    year = "2015",
    month = "1",
    doi = "10.1111/ced.12460",
    language = "English",
    volume = "40",
    pages = "31--34",
    journal = "Clinical and Experimental Dermatology",
    issn = "0307-6938",
    publisher = "Wiley",
    number = "1",

    }

    Allergic contact dermatitis in children; has there been a change in allergens? / Vongyer, G. A.; Green, C. (Lead / Corresponding author).

    In: Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.2015, p. 31-34.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Allergic contact dermatitis in children; has there been a change in allergens?

    AU - Vongyer, G. A.

    AU - Green, C.

    N1 - © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

    PY - 2015/1

    Y1 - 2015/1

    N2 - Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is now recognized as a common relevant diagnosis in children. We reviewed the results of patch tests in children under 16 years of age over the 3-year period January 2009 to December 2011, comparing the results with those in a similar 3-year retrospective study performed in our unit for the period August 1999 to September 2002. In total, there were 137 children (70 girls and 67 boys) aged 3-15 years enrolled. Of these, 28 girls (40%) and 22 boys (32.8%) had a positive reaction to at least one allergen, with nickel sulfate and potassium dichromate being the most common allergens, each having an incidence of 7.2%, in contrast to the 20% incidence of nickel allergy in 1999-2002. The rate of fragrance allergy was unchanged at 5.8%, and rubber allergy incidence was greatly reduced. These results show that allergens may be changing in children, and that patch testing is still a useful test to consider.

    AB - Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is now recognized as a common relevant diagnosis in children. We reviewed the results of patch tests in children under 16 years of age over the 3-year period January 2009 to December 2011, comparing the results with those in a similar 3-year retrospective study performed in our unit for the period August 1999 to September 2002. In total, there were 137 children (70 girls and 67 boys) aged 3-15 years enrolled. Of these, 28 girls (40%) and 22 boys (32.8%) had a positive reaction to at least one allergen, with nickel sulfate and potassium dichromate being the most common allergens, each having an incidence of 7.2%, in contrast to the 20% incidence of nickel allergy in 1999-2002. The rate of fragrance allergy was unchanged at 5.8%, and rubber allergy incidence was greatly reduced. These results show that allergens may be changing in children, and that patch testing is still a useful test to consider.

    U2 - 10.1111/ced.12460

    DO - 10.1111/ced.12460

    M3 - Article

    VL - 40

    SP - 31

    EP - 34

    JO - Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

    JF - Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

    SN - 0307-6938

    IS - 1

    ER -