An increased B-type natriuretic peptide in the absence of a cardiac abnormality identifies those whose left ventricular mass will increase over time

M. Adnan Nadir (Lead / Corresponding author), Stephen Gandy, Sheila Ireland, Tom MacDonald, Ellie Dow, Graeme Houston, Chim Lang, Allan Struthers

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    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) with evolution of left ventricular mass (LVM) in optimally treated primary prevention patients.

    BACKGROUND: Patients who have an elevated BNP no cardiac abnormality on echocardiography are common and at increased risk of adverse events. One hypothesis is that an elevated BNP is an early sensitive indicator of who will develop future structural abnormalities such as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy.

    METHODS: We identified optimally treated primary prevention patients with no cardiac abnormality at baseline. In particular, they had no myocardial ischemia, LV hypertrophy, LV dysfunction, or left atrial enlargement. They had a diverse range of plasma BNP levels and underwent cardiac magnetic resonance at baseline and 3 years later on a 3T scanner.

    RESULTS: Fifty patients with a diverse range of BNP were studied (with BNP ≤10 pg/ml in 25 patients and >10 pg/ml in 25 patients). LVM increased (+4.7 ± 3.5 g) in 24 patients and decreased (-4.9 ± 2.8 g) in 26 patients (p < 0.01). Blood pressure by 24-h monitoring was virtually identical between those whose LVM increased (systolic blood pressure 122 ± 14 mm Hg) and those whose LVM decreased (systolic blood pressure 121 ± 11 mm Hg, p = 0.77). Plasma BNP was nearly 3 times higher in those whose LVM increased versus those in whom LVM decreased (21 ± 9.6 pg/ml vs. 7.9 ± 3.9 pg/ml, p < 0.01). The c-statistic for BNP was 0.88.

    CONCLUSIONS: In optimally treated primary prevention patients, plasma BNP levels are able to distinguish between those whose LVM will increase during the next 3 years versus those whose LVM will decrease during the next 3 years. This may explain why individuals with high BNP are at increased risk even if no cardiac abnormality can be detected initially.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)87-93
    Number of pages7
    JournalJACC: Heart Failure
    Volume3
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

    Keywords

    • B-type natriuretic peptide
    • left ventricular mass
    • Primary prevention
    • Hypertension

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