An overview of CRISPR-based tools and their improvements: new opportunities in understanding plant-pathogen interactions for better crop protection

Abdellah Barakate (Lead / Corresponding author), Jennifer Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)
222 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Modern omics platforms have made the determination of susceptible/resistance genes feasible in any species generating huge numbers of potential targets for crop protection. However, the efforts to validate these targets have been hampered by the lack of a fast, precise, and efficient gene targeting system in plants. Now, the repurposing of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has solved this problem. CRISPR/Cas9 is the latest synthetic endonuclease that has revolutionized basic research by allowing facile genome editing in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Gene knockout is now feasible at an unprecedented efficiency with the possibility of multiplexing several targets and even genome-wide mutagenesis screening. In a short time, this powerful tool has been engineered for an array of applications beyond gene editing. Here, we briefly describe the CRISPR/Cas9 system, its recent improvements and applications in gene manipulation and single DNA/RNA molecule analysis. We summarize a few recent tests targeting plant pathogens and discuss further potential applications in pest control and plant-pathogen interactions that will inform plant breeding for crop protection.

Original languageEnglish
Article number765
Number of pages7
JournalFrontiers in Plant Science
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

Keywords

  • CRISPR/Cas9
  • gene editing
  • plant-pathogen interactions
  • DNA double-stranded break
  • homologous recombination
  • Non-homologous end-joining

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