Asking women to complete health and maternal histories for maternity records: a qualitative study

Patricia E. Aitchison, Vikki A. Entwistle, Edwin van Teijlingen, Heather M. Whitford, Tracey Davidson, Tracy Humphrey, Janet S. Tucker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Midwives usually document women’s health and maternal histories
    during booking appointments. This qualitative study of use of the Scottish
    Woman Held Maternity Record (SWHMR) found some midwifery teams
    were asking women to document their own histories before these
    appointments. Pregnant women and midwives from these teams thought
    this could save midwives’ time, improve the accuracy of records and lead
    to more individually-appropriate discussions. However, some women were
    disappointed that midwives had not fully discussed what they had written.
    Some midwives from teams that had not asked women to document their
    own histories were sceptical about the likely accuracy and usefulness of
    women’s entries. If the potential advantages of asking women to document
    their own histories are to be safely realised, support must be available for
    women with limited English or reading and writing skills, and midwives
    must have time to review and discuss what women write.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)793-799
    Number of pages7
    JournalBritish Journal of Midwifery
    Volume21
    Issue number11
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

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