Assessment in schools related to literacy: reading

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

    Abstract

    This article explores reading assessments which occur in the classroom under the control of the class teacher. It considers group and individual norm-referenced tests, their advantages and disadvantages, and then discusses different kinds of computer-based test. Thereafter, it explores an authentic assessment of real reading, through systematic observation, group discussions, affective and motivational inventories, phonic and pre-reading sub-skills checklists, informal reading inventories and reading miscue inventories, retellings, fluency, portfolios, computer-aided assessment of real books, and peer and self-assessments. It concludes with the assertion that a formative assessment of reading in the classroom is more important than external high-stakes or psychometric testing.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationInternational encyclopedia of education
    EditorsPenelope Peterson, Eva Baker, Barry McGaw
    Place of PublicationOxford
    PublisherElsevier
    Pages189-195
    Number of pages7
    Edition3rd
    ISBN (Electronic)9780080448947
    ISBN (Print)9780080448930
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • Literacy
    • Reading
    • Children
    • Education

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