Automatic phonological activation during visual word recognition in bilingual children: a cross-language masked priming study in Grades 3 and 5

Karinne Sauval, Laetitia Perre, Lynne G. Duncan, Eva Marinus, Séverine Casalis (Lead / Corresponding author)

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Abstract

Previous masked-priming research has shown automatic phonological activation during visual word recognition in monolingual skilled-adult readers. Activation also occurs across languages in bilingual adult readers, suggesting that the activation of phonological representations is not language-specific. Less is known about developing readers: first, it is unclear whether there is automatic phonological activation during visual word recognition among children in general; and second, no empirical data exists on whether the activation of phonological representations is language-specific or not in bilingual children. The present study investigates these issues in bilingual third and fifth graders using cross-language phonological masked priming in a lexical decision task. Targets were French words and primes were English pseudowords of three types: (1) phonological primes - share phonological information with the target beginning (e.g., dee-DIMANCHE [Sunday], pronounced /di:/-/dimɑ̃ʃ/) (2) orthographic-control primes - control for letter(s) shared by the phonological prime and target (i.e., d) and their position (e.g., doo-DIMANCHE, pronounced /du:/-/dimɑ̃ʃ/); and (3) unrelated primes - share no phonological or orthographic information with the target beginning (e.g., pow-DIMANCHE, pronounced /paʊ/-/dimɑ̃ʃ/). Significant phonological priming was observed suggesting that: (1) phonological representations are rapidly and automatically activated by print during visual word recognition from Grade 3 onwards; and (2) the activation of phonological representations is not language-specific in bilingual children.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-77
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume154
Early online date9 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

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Keywords

  • Visual word recognition
  • Children
  • Phonology
  • Bilingualism
  • Masked priming

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abstract = "Previous masked-priming research has shown automatic phonological activation during visual word recognition in monolingual skilled-adult readers. Activation also occurs across languages in bilingual adult readers, suggesting that the activation of phonological representations is not language-specific. Less is known about developing readers: first, it is unclear whether there is automatic phonological activation during visual word recognition among children in general; and second, no empirical data exists on whether the activation of phonological representations is language-specific or not in bilingual children. The present study investigates these issues in bilingual third and fifth graders using cross-language phonological masked priming in a lexical decision task. Targets were French words and primes were English pseudowords of three types: (1) phonological primes - share phonological information with the target beginning (e.g., dee-DIMANCHE [Sunday], pronounced /di:/-/dimɑ̃ʃ/) (2) orthographic-control primes - control for letter(s) shared by the phonological prime and target (i.e., d) and their position (e.g., doo-DIMANCHE, pronounced /du:/-/dimɑ̃ʃ/); and (3) unrelated primes - share no phonological or orthographic information with the target beginning (e.g., pow-DIMANCHE, pronounced /paʊ/-/dimɑ̃ʃ/). Significant phonological priming was observed suggesting that: (1) phonological representations are rapidly and automatically activated by print during visual word recognition from Grade 3 onwards; and (2) the activation of phonological representations is not language-specific in bilingual children.",
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Automatic phonological activation during visual word recognition in bilingual children : a cross-language masked priming study in Grades 3 and 5. / Sauval, Karinne; Perre, Laetitia; Duncan, Lynne G.; Marinus, Eva; Casalis, Séverine (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 154, 02.2017, p. 64-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - a cross-language masked priming study in Grades 3 and 5

AU - Sauval, Karinne

AU - Perre, Laetitia

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AU - Marinus, Eva

AU - Casalis, Séverine

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KW - Visual word recognition

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KW - Phonology

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JO - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

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