Bi-orienting chromosomes: acrobatics on the mitotic spindle

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To maintain their genetic integrity, eukaryotic cells must segregate their chromosomes properly to opposite poles during mitosis. This process mainly depends on the forces generated by microtubules that attach to kinetochores. During prometaphase, kinetochores initially interact with a single microtubule that extends from a spindle pole and then move towards a spindle pole. Subsequently, microtubules that extend from the other spindle pole also interact with kinetochores and, eventually, each sister kinetochore attaches to microtubules that extend from opposite poles (sister kinetochore bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores interact with microtubules in wrong orientation, this must be corrected before the onset of anaphase. Here, I discuss the processes leading to bi-orientation and the mechanisms ensuring this pivotal state that is required for proper chromosome segregation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)521-533
    Number of pages13
    JournalChromosoma
    Volume117
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

    Keywords

    • KINETOCHORE-MICROTUBULE ATTACHMENT
    • NEWT LUNG-CELLS
    • AURORA-B
    • FISSION YEAST
    • BUDDING YEAST
    • SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE
    • MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE
    • NDC80 COMPLEX
    • DAM1 COMPLEX
    • RING COMPLEX

    Cite this

    @article{0a15829e63df4f8fbd592b59b9dad5ae,
    title = "Bi-orienting chromosomes: acrobatics on the mitotic spindle",
    abstract = "To maintain their genetic integrity, eukaryotic cells must segregate their chromosomes properly to opposite poles during mitosis. This process mainly depends on the forces generated by microtubules that attach to kinetochores. During prometaphase, kinetochores initially interact with a single microtubule that extends from a spindle pole and then move towards a spindle pole. Subsequently, microtubules that extend from the other spindle pole also interact with kinetochores and, eventually, each sister kinetochore attaches to microtubules that extend from opposite poles (sister kinetochore bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores interact with microtubules in wrong orientation, this must be corrected before the onset of anaphase. Here, I discuss the processes leading to bi-orientation and the mechanisms ensuring this pivotal state that is required for proper chromosome segregation.",
    keywords = "KINETOCHORE-MICROTUBULE ATTACHMENT, NEWT LUNG-CELLS, AURORA-B, FISSION YEAST, BUDDING YEAST, SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE, MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE, NDC80 COMPLEX, DAM1 COMPLEX, RING COMPLEX",
    author = "Tanaka, {Tomoyuki U.}",
    year = "2008",
    month = "12",
    doi = "10.1007/s00412-008-0173-5",
    language = "English",
    volume = "117",
    pages = "521--533",
    journal = "Chromosoma",
    issn = "0009-5915",
    publisher = "Springer Verlag",
    number = "6",

    }

    Bi-orienting chromosomes : acrobatics on the mitotic spindle. / Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.

    In: Chromosoma, Vol. 117, No. 6, 12.2008, p. 521-533.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Bi-orienting chromosomes

    T2 - acrobatics on the mitotic spindle

    AU - Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.

    PY - 2008/12

    Y1 - 2008/12

    N2 - To maintain their genetic integrity, eukaryotic cells must segregate their chromosomes properly to opposite poles during mitosis. This process mainly depends on the forces generated by microtubules that attach to kinetochores. During prometaphase, kinetochores initially interact with a single microtubule that extends from a spindle pole and then move towards a spindle pole. Subsequently, microtubules that extend from the other spindle pole also interact with kinetochores and, eventually, each sister kinetochore attaches to microtubules that extend from opposite poles (sister kinetochore bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores interact with microtubules in wrong orientation, this must be corrected before the onset of anaphase. Here, I discuss the processes leading to bi-orientation and the mechanisms ensuring this pivotal state that is required for proper chromosome segregation.

    AB - To maintain their genetic integrity, eukaryotic cells must segregate their chromosomes properly to opposite poles during mitosis. This process mainly depends on the forces generated by microtubules that attach to kinetochores. During prometaphase, kinetochores initially interact with a single microtubule that extends from a spindle pole and then move towards a spindle pole. Subsequently, microtubules that extend from the other spindle pole also interact with kinetochores and, eventually, each sister kinetochore attaches to microtubules that extend from opposite poles (sister kinetochore bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores interact with microtubules in wrong orientation, this must be corrected before the onset of anaphase. Here, I discuss the processes leading to bi-orientation and the mechanisms ensuring this pivotal state that is required for proper chromosome segregation.

    KW - KINETOCHORE-MICROTUBULE ATTACHMENT

    KW - NEWT LUNG-CELLS

    KW - AURORA-B

    KW - FISSION YEAST

    KW - BUDDING YEAST

    KW - SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE

    KW - MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE

    KW - NDC80 COMPLEX

    KW - DAM1 COMPLEX

    KW - RING COMPLEX

    U2 - 10.1007/s00412-008-0173-5

    DO - 10.1007/s00412-008-0173-5

    M3 - Review article

    C2 - 18677502

    VL - 117

    SP - 521

    EP - 533

    JO - Chromosoma

    JF - Chromosoma

    SN - 0009-5915

    IS - 6

    ER -