Big Data: Understanding how Creative Organisations Create and Sustain their Networks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Big data is an evolving term used to describe the variety, volume and velocity of large amounts of structured and unstructured data. It can offer useful insights at both operational and strategic levels, thereby helping organisations to move forward in times of rapid change and uncertainty. However, there are challenges in terms of how best to capture, store and make sense of data. Many cultural arts organisations generate value through the relationships they create and the networks they sustain, but far too often this data is not clearly articulated or evidenced to leverage insight, support and business opportunities. The ArtsAPI project aimed to understand the connections that underpin the ‘relational value’ within the arts sector. The R&D project resulted in the development of a proof of concept business modelling and analytic tool to enable arts organisations to generate new insights through data capture, visualisation and analysis. The numerical/analytical technique of Social Network Analysis (SNA) was used to visually map and analyse network structures and relationships found within and across the extended boundaries of five cultural arts organisations located in the UK. Based on the ‘blue print’ from the SNA research, seven scenario-based insights were generated that offered impact measures for debates around evidencing forms of cultural value. These scenarios were later mapped onto a semantic ontology to create a ‘SNA lite’ web-based tool. In the paper to be reported here, we will set the context and background of the project, briefly describe the research methodology and the outcomes that influenced the development of the ArtsAPI tool.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDesign for Next
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 12th EAD Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, 12-14 April 2017
EditorsLoredana Di Lucchio, Lorenzo Imbesi, Paul Atkinson
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherTaylor & Francis Online
PagesS435-S443
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9781138090231
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Sep 2017
Event12th European Academy of Design Conference: Design for Next - Faculty of Architecture in Valle Giulia, Rome, Italy
Duration: 12 Apr 201714 Apr 2017
http://www.designfornext.org/index.html (Link to Conference website)

Conference

Conference12th European Academy of Design Conference
Abbreviated titleEAD 12 2017
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period12/04/1714/04/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

network analysis
art
social network
business concept
scenario
data capture
Values
ontology
visualization
semantics
uncertainty
methodology

Keywords

  • Big data
  • Value
  • Social networks
  • Relationships
  • Creativity

Cite this

Bruce, F., Malcolm, J. S., & O'Neill, S. (2017). Big Data: Understanding how Creative Organisations Create and Sustain their Networks. In L. Di Lucchio, L. Imbesi, & P. Atkinson (Eds.), Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, 12-14 April 2017 (pp. S435-S443). Abingdon: Taylor & Francis Online. https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2017.1352961
Bruce, Fraser ; Malcolm, Jacquelyn Strachan ; O'Neill, Shaleph. / Big Data: Understanding how Creative Organisations Create and Sustain their Networks. Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, 12-14 April 2017. editor / Loredana Di Lucchio ; Lorenzo Imbesi ; Paul Atkinson. Abingdon : Taylor & Francis Online, 2017. pp. S435-S443
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author = "Fraser Bruce and Malcolm, {Jacquelyn Strachan} and Shaleph O'Neill",
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Bruce, F, Malcolm, JS & O'Neill, S 2017, Big Data: Understanding how Creative Organisations Create and Sustain their Networks. in L Di Lucchio, L Imbesi & P Atkinson (eds), Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, 12-14 April 2017. Taylor & Francis Online, Abingdon, pp. S435-S443, 12th European Academy of Design Conference, Rome, Italy, 12/04/17. https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2017.1352961

Big Data: Understanding how Creative Organisations Create and Sustain their Networks. / Bruce, Fraser; Malcolm, Jacquelyn Strachan; O'Neill, Shaleph.

Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, 12-14 April 2017. ed. / Loredana Di Lucchio; Lorenzo Imbesi; Paul Atkinson. Abingdon : Taylor & Francis Online, 2017. p. S435-S443.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Bruce F, Malcolm JS, O'Neill S. Big Data: Understanding how Creative Organisations Create and Sustain their Networks. In Di Lucchio L, Imbesi L, Atkinson P, editors, Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference, Sapienza University of Rome, 12-14 April 2017. Abingdon: Taylor & Francis Online. 2017. p. S435-S443 https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2017.1352961