British British Polish Polish

Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today

Michael Peter (Subject), Oliver Basciano (Other contribution)

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

The starting point of the exhibition British British Polish Polish. Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today presented in 2013 at the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art was to show the unique simultaneous bloom of contemporary art in the UK as well as in Poland at the turn of the eighties and nineties, often associated with Young British Art and Polish Critical Art. Their representatives, in a direct manner, undertook basic human questions – life and death, sex and violence, ethics and politics – thereby provoking lively and important discussions in their countries, and also involving the media, which helped to transform contemporary art in the UK and Poland from a niche field – arousing interest only for the privy as it would seem – into the broader popular culture. This process was taking place during rapid economic and social changes in both countries: in Britain it was the Big Bang, caused by the sudden deregulation of financial markets in 1986, the same year in which Damien Hirst began his studies at Goldsmiths' College; in Poland, there was the turbulent process of the political transformation after the fall of communism in 1989.

The presentation of the most important works of British and Polish art from the nineties was complemented with the works of young artists from the UK and Poland, who appeared after the global financial crisis of 2007/2008. From this, the question was asked: do eminent contemporary artists refer to the legacy of their predecessors, or do they reject it, or perhaps simply ignore it? And are we still stuck in the "long-nineties," or are we already living in new, yet unnamed times?

Along with the exhibition British British Polish Polish, work began on an extensive publication (in English and Polish) containing the texts of the curators – Tom Morton and Marek Goździewski – as well as J.J. Charlesworth, Isobel Harbison, Izabela Kowalczyk, Paweł Możdżyński, and Jakub Bąk. The book also contains interviews with all the artists who partook in the exhibition, as well as a rich calendar – developed by Oliver Basciano and Maryla Sitkowska – of British and Polish cultural and political scenes from the nineties and a selection of excerpts from the British and Polish press commenting on the achievements of Young British Art and Polish Critical Art.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationWarsaw
PublisherUjazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art
Number of pages428
ISBN (Print)978-83-61156-59-8
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Art
Poland
British Art
Critical Arts
Artist
Calendar
Young Artists
Global Financial Crisis
Niche
Political Transformation
Economic Change
Popular Culture
Goldsmiths College
Deregulation
Big Bang
Financial Markets
Communism

Cite this

Peter, M., & Basciano, O. (2016). British British Polish Polish: Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today. Warsaw: Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art.
Peter, Michael ; Basciano, Oliver . / British British Polish Polish : Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today. Warsaw : Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, 2016. 428 p.
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Peter, M & Basciano, O 2016, British British Polish Polish: Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today. Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw.

British British Polish Polish : Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today. / Peter, Michael (Subject); Basciano, Oliver (Other contribution).

Warsaw : Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, 2016. 428 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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AB - The starting point of the exhibition British British Polish Polish. Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today presented in 2013 at the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art was to show the unique simultaneous bloom of contemporary art in the UK as well as in Poland at the turn of the eighties and nineties, often associated with Young British Art and Polish Critical Art. Their representatives, in a direct manner, undertook basic human questions – life and death, sex and violence, ethics and politics – thereby provoking lively and important discussions in their countries, and also involving the media, which helped to transform contemporary art in the UK and Poland from a niche field – arousing interest only for the privy as it would seem – into the broader popular culture. This process was taking place during rapid economic and social changes in both countries: in Britain it was the Big Bang, caused by the sudden deregulation of financial markets in 1986, the same year in which Damien Hirst began his studies at Goldsmiths' College; in Poland, there was the turbulent process of the political transformation after the fall of communism in 1989.The presentation of the most important works of British and Polish art from the nineties was complemented with the works of young artists from the UK and Poland, who appeared after the global financial crisis of 2007/2008. From this, the question was asked: do eminent contemporary artists refer to the legacy of their predecessors, or do they reject it, or perhaps simply ignore it? And are we still stuck in the "long-nineties," or are we already living in new, yet unnamed times?Along with the exhibition British British Polish Polish, work began on an extensive publication (in English and Polish) containing the texts of the curators – Tom Morton and Marek Goździewski – as well as J.J. Charlesworth, Isobel Harbison, Izabela Kowalczyk, Paweł Możdżyński, and Jakub Bąk. The book also contains interviews with all the artists who partook in the exhibition, as well as a rich calendar – developed by Oliver Basciano and Maryla Sitkowska – of British and Polish cultural and political scenes from the nineties and a selection of excerpts from the British and Polish press commenting on the achievements of Young British Art and Polish Critical Art.

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Peter M, Basciano O. British British Polish Polish: Art from Europe's Edges in the Long '90s and Today. Warsaw: Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, 2016. 428 p.