Bystander effects and their implications for clinical radiotherapy

Alastair J. Munro

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    30 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as those biological effects expressed, after irradiation, by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. Radiation oncologists are only gradually beginning to appreciate the clinical relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects and associated phenomena: adaptive responses, genomic instability and abscopal effects. Incorporating bystander effects into the science underpinning clinical radiotherapy will involve moving beyond simple mechanistic models and towards a more systems-based approach. It is, given the protean nature of bystander effects, difficult to devise a coherent research strategy to investigate the clinical impact and relevance of bystander phenomena. Epidemiological approaches will be required, the traditional research models based on randomised controlled trials are unlikely to be adequate for the task. Any consideration of bystander effects challenges not only clinicians' preconceptions concerning the effects of radiation on tumours and normal tissues but also their ingenuity. This review covers, from a clinical perspective, the issues and problems associated with radiation-induced bystander effects.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)A133-A142
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Radiological Protection
    Volume29
    Issue number2A
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

    Keywords

    • INDUCED GENOMIC INSTABILITY
    • EVENING PRIMROSE OIL
    • IONIZING-RADIATION
    • DNA-DAMAGE
    • STATIN USE
    • IN-VITRO
    • COLORECTAL-CANCER
    • SYSTEMS BIOLOGY
    • TISSUE
    • CELL

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