Calcium antagonists and hormone release: effect of nifedipine on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced pituitary hormone release

A. D. Struthers, J. A. Millar, G. H. Beastall, W. B. McIntosh, John L. Reid

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In vitro evidence suggests that calcium is involved in the release of anterior pituitary hormones. Therefore, we studied the effect of the slow calcium channel blocker or calcium antagonist nifedipine on the FSH and LH responses to LRH and the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in vivo. Nine normal male subjects were studied on two occasions, and nifedipine (20 mg, by mouth, or matching placebo) was administered in a randomized single blind manner. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at 0 and 30 min. The patients then received TRH (200 micrograms) and LRH (100 micrograms) iv. Blood levels of FSH, LH, TSH, and PRL were measured by RIA at 0, 30, 50, 60, and 120 min. Nifedipine lowered diastolic blood pressure significantly (--12 +/- 8 mm Hg; P less than 0.005) and increased heart rate (+ 17 /*- 10 beats/min; P less than 0.005), but had no effect on either baseline hormone levels or the incremental response of any hormone to its secretagogue. In contrast to the results of previous studies with verapamil, nifedipine does not inhibit the release of pituitary hormones. More information is required on the precise intracellular actions of these drugs before they can be used to study the role of calcium in hormone release. Nifedipine, however, may be less likely to influence pituitary function than verapamil.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)401-404
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
    Volume56
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 1983

    Fingerprint

    Hormone Antagonists
    Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone
    Pituitary Hormones
    Nifedipine
    Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
    Calcium
    Blood pressure
    Hormones
    Verapamil
    Blood Pressure
    Heart Rate
    Anterior Pituitary Hormones
    Calcium Channel Blockers
    Mouth
    Blood
    Placebos
    Pharmaceutical Preparations

    Cite this

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    title = "Calcium antagonists and hormone release: effect of nifedipine on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced pituitary hormone release",
    abstract = "In vitro evidence suggests that calcium is involved in the release of anterior pituitary hormones. Therefore, we studied the effect of the slow calcium channel blocker or calcium antagonist nifedipine on the FSH and LH responses to LRH and the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in vivo. Nine normal male subjects were studied on two occasions, and nifedipine (20 mg, by mouth, or matching placebo) was administered in a randomized single blind manner. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at 0 and 30 min. The patients then received TRH (200 micrograms) and LRH (100 micrograms) iv. Blood levels of FSH, LH, TSH, and PRL were measured by RIA at 0, 30, 50, 60, and 120 min. Nifedipine lowered diastolic blood pressure significantly (--12 +/- 8 mm Hg; P less than 0.005) and increased heart rate (+ 17 /*- 10 beats/min; P less than 0.005), but had no effect on either baseline hormone levels or the incremental response of any hormone to its secretagogue. In contrast to the results of previous studies with verapamil, nifedipine does not inhibit the release of pituitary hormones. More information is required on the precise intracellular actions of these drugs before they can be used to study the role of calcium in hormone release. Nifedipine, however, may be less likely to influence pituitary function than verapamil.",
    author = "Struthers, {A. D.} and Millar, {J. A.} and Beastall, {G. H.} and McIntosh, {W. B.} and Reid, {John L.}",
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    Calcium antagonists and hormone release : effect of nifedipine on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced pituitary hormone release. / Struthers, A. D.; Millar, J. A.; Beastall, G. H.; McIntosh, W. B.; Reid, John L.

    In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Vol. 56, No. 2, 01.02.1983, p. 401-404.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

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    T2 - effect of nifedipine on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced pituitary hormone release

    AU - Struthers, A. D.

    AU - Millar, J. A.

    AU - Beastall, G. H.

    AU - McIntosh, W. B.

    AU - Reid, John L.

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    N2 - In vitro evidence suggests that calcium is involved in the release of anterior pituitary hormones. Therefore, we studied the effect of the slow calcium channel blocker or calcium antagonist nifedipine on the FSH and LH responses to LRH and the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in vivo. Nine normal male subjects were studied on two occasions, and nifedipine (20 mg, by mouth, or matching placebo) was administered in a randomized single blind manner. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at 0 and 30 min. The patients then received TRH (200 micrograms) and LRH (100 micrograms) iv. Blood levels of FSH, LH, TSH, and PRL were measured by RIA at 0, 30, 50, 60, and 120 min. Nifedipine lowered diastolic blood pressure significantly (--12 +/- 8 mm Hg; P less than 0.005) and increased heart rate (+ 17 /*- 10 beats/min; P less than 0.005), but had no effect on either baseline hormone levels or the incremental response of any hormone to its secretagogue. In contrast to the results of previous studies with verapamil, nifedipine does not inhibit the release of pituitary hormones. More information is required on the precise intracellular actions of these drugs before they can be used to study the role of calcium in hormone release. Nifedipine, however, may be less likely to influence pituitary function than verapamil.

    AB - In vitro evidence suggests that calcium is involved in the release of anterior pituitary hormones. Therefore, we studied the effect of the slow calcium channel blocker or calcium antagonist nifedipine on the FSH and LH responses to LRH and the TSH and PRL responses to TRH in vivo. Nine normal male subjects were studied on two occasions, and nifedipine (20 mg, by mouth, or matching placebo) was administered in a randomized single blind manner. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at 0 and 30 min. The patients then received TRH (200 micrograms) and LRH (100 micrograms) iv. Blood levels of FSH, LH, TSH, and PRL were measured by RIA at 0, 30, 50, 60, and 120 min. Nifedipine lowered diastolic blood pressure significantly (--12 +/- 8 mm Hg; P less than 0.005) and increased heart rate (+ 17 /*- 10 beats/min; P less than 0.005), but had no effect on either baseline hormone levels or the incremental response of any hormone to its secretagogue. In contrast to the results of previous studies with verapamil, nifedipine does not inhibit the release of pituitary hormones. More information is required on the precise intracellular actions of these drugs before they can be used to study the role of calcium in hormone release. Nifedipine, however, may be less likely to influence pituitary function than verapamil.

    U2 - 10.1210/jcem-56-2-401

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