Can pragmatic trials help us better understand chronic pain and improve treatment?

Michael C. Rowbotham, Ian Gilron, Clara Glazer, Andrew S. C. Rice, Blair H. Smith, Walter F. Stewart, Ajay D. Wasan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Pragmatic trials assessing effectiveness complement efficacy trials for improving clinical care. Efficacy trials of novel interventions, especially for regulatory purposes, may not translate to obvious effectiveness once the interventions enter routine clinical practice. This translation gap may exist for a number of reasons, relating to ''real world'' populations and health care systems, or the presence of unidentified confounders and comorbidities. While pragmatic trials have limitations, approaches such as those suggested here should be considered by the clinical and academic pain community.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)643-646
    Number of pages4
    JournalPain
    Volume154
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2013

    Keywords

    • DESIGN
    • ADHERENCE
    • ANTAGONISTS
    • VALIDITY
    • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIALS
    • OPIOIDS
    • CLINICAL-TRIAL
    • STATEMENT
    • PRIMARY-CARE
    • 1ST-LINE

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