Capturing Motion and Depth before Cinematography

Nicholas J. Wade (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
256 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Visual representations of biological states have traditionally faced two problems: they lacked motion and depth. Attempts were made to supply these wants over many centuries, but the major advances were made in the early-nineteenth century. Motion was synthesized by sequences of slightly different images presented in rapid succession and depth was added by presenting slightly different images to each eye. Apparent motion and depth were combined some years later, but they tended to be applied separately. The major figures in this early period were Wheatstone, Plateau, Horner, Duboscq, Claudet, and Purkinje. Others later in the century, like Marey and Muybridge, were stimulated to extend the uses to which apparent motion and photography could be applied to examining body movements. These developments occurred before the birth of cinematography, and significant insights were derived from attempts to combine motion and depth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-22
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of the History of the Neurosciences
Volume25
Issue number1
Early online date18 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

Keywords

  • optical instruments
  • precinema
  • stereoscopic vision
  • stroboscopic motion

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