Chained to the Digital Camp: review essay of Byung Chul Han’s Psychopolitics: Neoliberalism and New Technologies of Power

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

152 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Capital thrives on chaos and the ‘libidinization’ of value. Its ceaseless self-reinvention is systemically violent; it grinds habit, destroys existential territories and deracinates stability. The working of capital is like that of a RIP [radically invasive projectile] bullet. Small, compact and elegantly shaped, a RIP doesn’t just penetrate the body. It triggers a series of explosions yet cannot be removed from the body without dismembering it. The aesthetic and affective tools of late capitalism – easification, gamification and that forever-out-of-reach-remaining ‘final gratification’ or ‘added value’, which, after a century of advertising, is experienced as deserved in all spheres of life: wealth, talent, even looks – are similarly smooth yet deadly. Agent-lessly, they produce automated misery.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedia Theory
VolumeOctober 2018
Publication statusPublished - 18 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Projectile
Technology of Power
Neoliberalism
Capitalism
Trigger
Wealth
Chaos
Habit
Aesthetics
Affective
Misery

Cite this

@article{59b5e96403c842a8861b7e408d229729,
title = "Chained to the Digital Camp: review essay of Byung Chul Han’s Psychopolitics: Neoliberalism and New Technologies of Power",
abstract = "Capital thrives on chaos and the ‘libidinization’ of value. Its ceaseless self-reinvention is systemically violent; it grinds habit, destroys existential territories and deracinates stability. The working of capital is like that of a RIP [radically invasive projectile] bullet. Small, compact and elegantly shaped, a RIP doesn’t just penetrate the body. It triggers a series of explosions yet cannot be removed from the body without dismembering it. The aesthetic and affective tools of late capitalism – easification, gamification and that forever-out-of-reach-remaining ‘final gratification’ or ‘added value’, which, after a century of advertising, is experienced as deserved in all spheres of life: wealth, talent, even looks – are similarly smooth yet deadly. Agent-lessly, they produce automated misery.",
author = "Natasha Lushetich",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "18",
language = "English",
volume = "October 2018",
journal = "Media Theory",
issn = "2557-826X",

}

Chained to the Digital Camp : review essay of Byung Chul Han’s Psychopolitics: Neoliberalism and New Technologies of Power. / Lushetich, Natasha.

In: Media Theory, Vol. October 2018, 18.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chained to the Digital Camp

T2 - review essay of Byung Chul Han’s Psychopolitics: Neoliberalism and New Technologies of Power

AU - Lushetich, Natasha

PY - 2018/10/18

Y1 - 2018/10/18

N2 - Capital thrives on chaos and the ‘libidinization’ of value. Its ceaseless self-reinvention is systemically violent; it grinds habit, destroys existential territories and deracinates stability. The working of capital is like that of a RIP [radically invasive projectile] bullet. Small, compact and elegantly shaped, a RIP doesn’t just penetrate the body. It triggers a series of explosions yet cannot be removed from the body without dismembering it. The aesthetic and affective tools of late capitalism – easification, gamification and that forever-out-of-reach-remaining ‘final gratification’ or ‘added value’, which, after a century of advertising, is experienced as deserved in all spheres of life: wealth, talent, even looks – are similarly smooth yet deadly. Agent-lessly, they produce automated misery.

AB - Capital thrives on chaos and the ‘libidinization’ of value. Its ceaseless self-reinvention is systemically violent; it grinds habit, destroys existential territories and deracinates stability. The working of capital is like that of a RIP [radically invasive projectile] bullet. Small, compact and elegantly shaped, a RIP doesn’t just penetrate the body. It triggers a series of explosions yet cannot be removed from the body without dismembering it. The aesthetic and affective tools of late capitalism – easification, gamification and that forever-out-of-reach-remaining ‘final gratification’ or ‘added value’, which, after a century of advertising, is experienced as deserved in all spheres of life: wealth, talent, even looks – are similarly smooth yet deadly. Agent-lessly, they produce automated misery.

M3 - Book/Film/Article review

VL - October 2018

JO - Media Theory

JF - Media Theory

SN - 2557-826X

ER -