Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - Part 1

protein stains

Kevin J. Farrugia, Kathleen A. Savage (Lead / Corresponding author), Helen Bandey, Niamh Nic Daéid (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A range of protein stains were utilised for the enhancement of footwear impressions on a variety of fabric types of different colours with blood as a contaminant. A semi-automated stamping device was used to deliver test impressions at a set force to minimise the variability between impressions; multiple impressions were produced and enhanced by each reagent to determine the repeatability of the enhancement. Results indicated that while most protein stains used in this study successfully enhanced impressions in blood on light coloured fabrics, background staining caused interference on natural fabrics. Enhancement on dark coloured fabrics was only achieved using fluorescent protein stains, as non-fluorescent protein stains provided poor contrast.A further comparison was performed with commercially available protein staining solutions and solutions prepared within the laboratory from the appropriate chemicals. Both solutions performed equally well, though it is recommended to use freshly prepared solutions whenever possible.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-109
Number of pages11
JournalScience & Justice
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

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Coloring Agents
Proteins
Laboratory Chemicals
Staining and Labeling
Color
Light
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

Farrugia, Kevin J. ; Savage, Kathleen A. ; Bandey, Helen ; Nic Daéid, Niamh. / Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - Part 1 : protein stains. In: Science & Justice. 2011 ; Vol. 51, No. 3. pp. 99-109.
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Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - Part 1 : protein stains. / Farrugia, Kevin J.; Savage, Kathleen A. (Lead / Corresponding author); Bandey, Helen; Nic Daéid, Niamh (Lead / Corresponding author).

In: Science & Justice, Vol. 51, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 99-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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