Children's reasoning about self-presentation following rule violations: The role of self-focused attention

Robin Banerjee, Mark Bennett, Nikki Luke

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Rule violations are likely to serve as key contexts for learning to reason about public identity. In an initial study with 91 children aged 4-9years, social emotions and self-presentational concerns were more likely to be cited when children were responding to hypothetical vignettes involving social-conventional rather than moral violations. In 2 further studies with 376 children aged 4-9years, experimental manipulations of self-focused attention (either by leading children to believe they were being video-recorded or by varying audience reactions to transgressions) were found to elicit greater attention to social evaluation following moral violations, although self-presentational concerns were consistently salient in the context of social-conventional violations. The role of rule transgressions in children's emerging self-awareness and social understanding is discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1805-1821
    Number of pages17
    JournalChild Development
    Volume83
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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