Competition for private and state school teachers

Francis Green, Stephen MacHin, Richard Murphy, Yu Zhu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We analyse the role of private schools in the teachers' labour market. Private schools employ an increasingly-disproportionate share of teachers in Britain, relative to the number of their pupils. Their teachers are more likely than state school teachers to possess post-graduate qualifications, and to be specialists in shortage subjects. Recruitment from the state sector is an important and growing source of new teaching staff for private schools, and a small though increasing deduction from the supply of new teachers available to state schools. Private school teachers enjoy greater job satisfaction, work with fewer pupils, enjoy longer holidays and, in the case of women, shorter weekly hours. Among women, pay is lower in the private sector, which we interpret as a compensating differential. For men, there is no significant inter-sectoral difference in pay. However, for both men and women there is evidence of a substantial pay premium for private-school teachers trained in shortage subjects.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)383-404
    Number of pages22
    JournalJournal of Education and Work
    Volume21
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2008

    Fingerprint

    private school
    teacher
    school
    shortage
    number of pupils
    holidays
    deduction
    premium
    job satisfaction
    qualification
    Private schools
    private sector
    pupil
    labor market
    graduate
    supply
    evidence
    Shortage

    Keywords

    • Job satisfaction
    • Pay
    • Recruitment
    • Teachers
    • Working conditions

    Cite this

    Green, Francis ; MacHin, Stephen ; Murphy, Richard ; Zhu, Yu. / Competition for private and state school teachers. In: Journal of Education and Work. 2008 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 383-404.
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    Competition for private and state school teachers. / Green, Francis; MacHin, Stephen; Murphy, Richard; Zhu, Yu.

    In: Journal of Education and Work, Vol. 21, No. 5, 05.12.2008, p. 383-404.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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