Compulsivity in opioid dependence

Serenella Tolomeo (Lead / Corresponding author), Keith Matthews, J. Douglas Steele, Alex Baldacchino

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    Abstract

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between compulsivity versus impulsivity and structural MRI abnormalities in opioid dependence.
    Method: We recruited 146 participants: i) patients with a history of opioiddependence due to chronic heroin use (n=24), ii) heroin users stabilised on methadone maintenance treatment (n=48), iii) abstinent participants with a history of opioid dependence due to heroin use (n=24) and iv) healthy controls(n=50). Compulsivity was measured using Intra/Extra-Dimensional (IED) Task and impulsivity was measured using the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT). Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were also obtained.
    Results: As hypothesised, compulsivity was negatively associated with impulsivity (p<0.02). Testing for the neural substrates of compulsivity versus impulsivity, we found a higher compulsivity/impulsivity ratio associated with significantly decreased white matter adjacent to the nucleus accumbens, bed nucleus of stria terminalis and rostral cingulate in the abstinent group,compared to the other opioid dependent groups. In addition, self-reportedduration of opioid exposure correlated negatively with bilateral globus pallidusgrey matter reductions.
    Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with Volkow & Koob’s addiction models and underline the important role of compulsivity versus impulsivity in opioid dependence. Our results have implications for the treatment of opioid dependence supporting the assertion of different behavioural and biological phenotypes in the opioid dependence and abstinence syndromes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)333-339
    Number of pages7
    JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
    Volume81
    Early online date14 Sep 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2018

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    Impulsive Behavior
    Opioid Analgesics
    Heroin
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Septal Nuclei
    Gambling
    Methadone
    Nucleus Accumbens
    Phenotype
    Therapeutics

    Cite this

    @article{ba2e941a51a545dcb7e2de81aad95f74,
    title = "Compulsivity in opioid dependence",
    abstract = "Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between compulsivity versus impulsivity and structural MRI abnormalities in opioid dependence.Method: We recruited 146 participants: i) patients with a history of opioiddependence due to chronic heroin use (n=24), ii) heroin users stabilised on methadone maintenance treatment (n=48), iii) abstinent participants with a history of opioid dependence due to heroin use (n=24) and iv) healthy controls(n=50). Compulsivity was measured using Intra/Extra-Dimensional (IED) Task and impulsivity was measured using the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT). Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were also obtained.Results: As hypothesised, compulsivity was negatively associated with impulsivity (p<0.02). Testing for the neural substrates of compulsivity versus impulsivity, we found a higher compulsivity/impulsivity ratio associated with significantly decreased white matter adjacent to the nucleus accumbens, bed nucleus of stria terminalis and rostral cingulate in the abstinent group,compared to the other opioid dependent groups. In addition, self-reportedduration of opioid exposure correlated negatively with bilateral globus pallidusgrey matter reductions.Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with Volkow & Koob’s addiction models and underline the important role of compulsivity versus impulsivity in opioid dependence. Our results have implications for the treatment of opioid dependence supporting the assertion of different behavioural and biological phenotypes in the opioid dependence and abstinence syndromes.",
    author = "Serenella Tolomeo and Keith Matthews and Steele, {J. Douglas} and Alex Baldacchino",
    note = "Funding/Support: This study was part funded by an unrestricted educational grant provided by Schering-Plough and a grant by an Anonymous Trust. Study support was also provided by the Scottish Mental Health Research Network. The funding sources had no role in the design, conduct of the study and interpretation of the data. ST has received funding from Merck Serono and Lundbeck, JDS has received research funding via an honorarium associated with a lecture from Wyeth and an unrestricted educational grant from Schering-Plough, KM has chaired advisory boards for studies of Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder sponsored by Medtronic. He has received educational grants from Cyberonics Inc. and Schering Plough, and he has received research project funding from Schering-Plough, Merck Serono, and Indivior and also from St Jude Medical for a multi-centre clinical trial of Deep Brain Stimulation for depression. He has received travel and accommodation support to attend meetings from Medtronic and St Jude Medical. AB has received educational grants from Schering Plough and he has received research project funding from ScheringPlough, Merck Serono and Indivior.",
    year = "2018",
    month = "2",
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    doi = "10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.09.007",
    language = "English",
    volume = "81",
    pages = "333--339",
    journal = "Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry",
    issn = "0278-5846",
    publisher = "Elsevier",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Compulsivity in opioid dependence

    AU - Tolomeo, Serenella

    AU - Matthews, Keith

    AU - Steele, J. Douglas

    AU - Baldacchino, Alex

    N1 - Funding/Support: This study was part funded by an unrestricted educational grant provided by Schering-Plough and a grant by an Anonymous Trust. Study support was also provided by the Scottish Mental Health Research Network. The funding sources had no role in the design, conduct of the study and interpretation of the data. ST has received funding from Merck Serono and Lundbeck, JDS has received research funding via an honorarium associated with a lecture from Wyeth and an unrestricted educational grant from Schering-Plough, KM has chaired advisory boards for studies of Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder sponsored by Medtronic. He has received educational grants from Cyberonics Inc. and Schering Plough, and he has received research project funding from Schering-Plough, Merck Serono, and Indivior and also from St Jude Medical for a multi-centre clinical trial of Deep Brain Stimulation for depression. He has received travel and accommodation support to attend meetings from Medtronic and St Jude Medical. AB has received educational grants from Schering Plough and he has received research project funding from ScheringPlough, Merck Serono and Indivior.

    PY - 2018/2/2

    Y1 - 2018/2/2

    N2 - Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between compulsivity versus impulsivity and structural MRI abnormalities in opioid dependence.Method: We recruited 146 participants: i) patients with a history of opioiddependence due to chronic heroin use (n=24), ii) heroin users stabilised on methadone maintenance treatment (n=48), iii) abstinent participants with a history of opioid dependence due to heroin use (n=24) and iv) healthy controls(n=50). Compulsivity was measured using Intra/Extra-Dimensional (IED) Task and impulsivity was measured using the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT). Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were also obtained.Results: As hypothesised, compulsivity was negatively associated with impulsivity (p<0.02). Testing for the neural substrates of compulsivity versus impulsivity, we found a higher compulsivity/impulsivity ratio associated with significantly decreased white matter adjacent to the nucleus accumbens, bed nucleus of stria terminalis and rostral cingulate in the abstinent group,compared to the other opioid dependent groups. In addition, self-reportedduration of opioid exposure correlated negatively with bilateral globus pallidusgrey matter reductions.Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with Volkow & Koob’s addiction models and underline the important role of compulsivity versus impulsivity in opioid dependence. Our results have implications for the treatment of opioid dependence supporting the assertion of different behavioural and biological phenotypes in the opioid dependence and abstinence syndromes.

    AB - Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between compulsivity versus impulsivity and structural MRI abnormalities in opioid dependence.Method: We recruited 146 participants: i) patients with a history of opioiddependence due to chronic heroin use (n=24), ii) heroin users stabilised on methadone maintenance treatment (n=48), iii) abstinent participants with a history of opioid dependence due to heroin use (n=24) and iv) healthy controls(n=50). Compulsivity was measured using Intra/Extra-Dimensional (IED) Task and impulsivity was measured using the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT). Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data were also obtained.Results: As hypothesised, compulsivity was negatively associated with impulsivity (p<0.02). Testing for the neural substrates of compulsivity versus impulsivity, we found a higher compulsivity/impulsivity ratio associated with significantly decreased white matter adjacent to the nucleus accumbens, bed nucleus of stria terminalis and rostral cingulate in the abstinent group,compared to the other opioid dependent groups. In addition, self-reportedduration of opioid exposure correlated negatively with bilateral globus pallidusgrey matter reductions.Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with Volkow & Koob’s addiction models and underline the important role of compulsivity versus impulsivity in opioid dependence. Our results have implications for the treatment of opioid dependence supporting the assertion of different behavioural and biological phenotypes in the opioid dependence and abstinence syndromes.

    U2 - 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.09.007

    DO - 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.09.007

    M3 - Article

    VL - 81

    SP - 333

    EP - 339

    JO - Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry

    JF - Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry

    SN - 0278-5846

    ER -