Consistency of extreme response style and non-extreme response style across traits

Eunike Wetzel, Claus H Carstensen, Jan Boehnke

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    33 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The consistency of extreme response style (ERS) and non-extreme response style (NERS) across the latent variables assessed in an instrument is investigated. Analyses were conducted on several PISA 2006 attitude scales and the German NEO-PI-R. First, a mixed partial credit model (PCM) and a constrained mixed PCM were compared regarding model fit. If the constrained mixed PCM fit better, latent classes differed only in their response styles but not in the latent variable. For scales where this was the case, participants’ membership to NERS or ERS on each scale was entered into a latent class analysis (LCA). For both instruments, this second order LCA revealed that the response style was consistent for the majority of the participants across latent variables.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)178-189
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Research in Personality
    Volume47
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2013

    Cite this

    @article{e8f9cdc56372484eaa60152fb4162ba0,
    title = "Consistency of extreme response style and non-extreme response style across traits",
    abstract = "The consistency of extreme response style (ERS) and non-extreme response style (NERS) across the latent variables assessed in an instrument is investigated. Analyses were conducted on several PISA 2006 attitude scales and the German NEO-PI-R. First, a mixed partial credit model (PCM) and a constrained mixed PCM were compared regarding model fit. If the constrained mixed PCM fit better, latent classes differed only in their response styles but not in the latent variable. For scales where this was the case, participants’ membership to NERS or ERS on each scale was entered into a latent class analysis (LCA). For both instruments, this second order LCA revealed that the response style was consistent for the majority of the participants across latent variables.",
    author = "Eunike Wetzel and Carstensen, {Claus H} and Jan Boehnke",
    year = "2013",
    month = "4",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1016/j.jrp.2012.10.010",
    language = "English",
    volume = "47",
    pages = "178--189",
    journal = "Journal of Research in Personality",
    issn = "0092-6566",
    publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
    number = "2",

    }

    Consistency of extreme response style and non-extreme response style across traits. / Wetzel, Eunike; Carstensen, Claus H; Boehnke, Jan.

    In: Journal of Research in Personality, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 178-189.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Consistency of extreme response style and non-extreme response style across traits

    AU - Wetzel, Eunike

    AU - Carstensen, Claus H

    AU - Boehnke, Jan

    PY - 2013/4/1

    Y1 - 2013/4/1

    N2 - The consistency of extreme response style (ERS) and non-extreme response style (NERS) across the latent variables assessed in an instrument is investigated. Analyses were conducted on several PISA 2006 attitude scales and the German NEO-PI-R. First, a mixed partial credit model (PCM) and a constrained mixed PCM were compared regarding model fit. If the constrained mixed PCM fit better, latent classes differed only in their response styles but not in the latent variable. For scales where this was the case, participants’ membership to NERS or ERS on each scale was entered into a latent class analysis (LCA). For both instruments, this second order LCA revealed that the response style was consistent for the majority of the participants across latent variables.

    AB - The consistency of extreme response style (ERS) and non-extreme response style (NERS) across the latent variables assessed in an instrument is investigated. Analyses were conducted on several PISA 2006 attitude scales and the German NEO-PI-R. First, a mixed partial credit model (PCM) and a constrained mixed PCM were compared regarding model fit. If the constrained mixed PCM fit better, latent classes differed only in their response styles but not in the latent variable. For scales where this was the case, participants’ membership to NERS or ERS on each scale was entered into a latent class analysis (LCA). For both instruments, this second order LCA revealed that the response style was consistent for the majority of the participants across latent variables.

    U2 - 10.1016/j.jrp.2012.10.010

    DO - 10.1016/j.jrp.2012.10.010

    M3 - Article

    VL - 47

    SP - 178

    EP - 189

    JO - Journal of Research in Personality

    JF - Journal of Research in Personality

    SN - 0092-6566

    IS - 2

    ER -