Contrasting genetic regulation of plant development in wild barley grown in two European environments revealed by nested association mapping

Paul Herzig, Andreas Maurer, Vera Draba, Rajiv Sharma, Fulvia Draicchio, Hazel Bull, Linda Milne, William T. B. Thomas, Andrew J. Flavell, Klaus Pillen (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)
136 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Barley is cultivated more widely than the other major world crops because it adapts well to environmental constraints, such as drought, heat, and day length. To better understand the genetic control of local adaptation in barley, we studied development in the nested association mapping population HEB-25, derived from crossing 25 wild barley accessions with the cultivar 'Barke'. HEB-25 was cultivated in replicated field trials in Dundee (Scotland) and Halle (Germany), differing in regard to day length, precipitation, and temperature. Applying a genome-wide association study, we located 60 and 66 quantitative trait locus (QTL) regions regulating eight plant development traits in Dundee and Halle, respectively. A number of QTLs could be explained by known major genes such as PHOTOPERIOD 1 (Ppd-H1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (HvFT-1) that regulate plant development. In addition, we observed that developmental traits in HEB-25 were partly controlled via genotype × environment and genotype × donor interactions, defined as location-specific and family-specific QTL effects. Our findings indicate that QTL alleles are available in the wild barley gene pool that show contrasting effects on plant development, which may be deployed to improve adaptation of cultivated barley to future environmental changes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1517-1531
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume69
Issue number7
Early online date18 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare)
  • flowering
  • genome-wide association study (GWAS)
  • genotype by donor interaction (GxD)
  • genotype by environment interaction (GxE)
  • nested association mapping (NAM)
  • plant development
  • quantitative trait locus (QTL)
  • wild barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. Spontaneum)

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