Corporate risk management and legal strategy

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The board of directors has ultimate responsibility for strategies implemented by corporations. This chapter provides a link between the board’s risk management activities and corporate legal strategies. In this context, there are two relevant regulatory elements: the corporate governance rules that require companies to establish a risk management policy and the associated disclosure, and the specific legal requirements that the particular company risks breaching due to the nature of its operations. The theoretical part of the chapter examines the concept of strategy and explores the connections and tensions between corporate risk management policy, the expectations generated by risk management disclosures, the company’s true exposure to legal risks, and the implications for enterprise. The chapter then shifts focus to look at a number of examples that reveal the problems associated with treating the law as fixed. Examples include: the introduction of new statutory law where the company’s ability to generate and preserve useful evidence may become an issue (e.g. Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007, UK); established statutory duties where a degree of uncertainty remains due to difficulties in statutory interpretation (e.g. aspects of United Kingdom health and safety law); and established law that becomes subject to change in a common law system (e.g. the duty of care to those injured on company premises). These examples are linked back to the opening discussion of corporate governance principles with the aim of highlighting difficulties and inconsistencies faced by a board in coping with both its governance role and its role in corporate legal strategy.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationLegal strategies: how corporations use law to improve performance
    EditorsAntoine Masson, Mary J. Shariff
    PublisherSpringer
    Pages247-265
    Number of pages19
    ISBN (Print)9783642021350, 9783642021343
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Fingerprint

    Corporate risk management
    Risk management
    Disclosure
    Corporate governance
    Responsibility
    Governance
    Health and safety
    Board of directors
    Common law
    Homicide
    Uncertainty
    Management activities
    Inconsistency

    Keywords

    • Risk management
    • Corporate governance

    Cite this

    Belcher, A. (2009). Corporate risk management and legal strategy. In A. Masson, & M. J. Shariff (Eds.), Legal strategies: how corporations use law to improve performance (pp. 247-265). Springer . https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02135-0_11
    Belcher, Alice. / Corporate risk management and legal strategy. Legal strategies: how corporations use law to improve performance. editor / Antoine Masson ; Mary J. Shariff. Springer , 2009. pp. 247-265
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    Belcher, A 2009, Corporate risk management and legal strategy. in A Masson & MJ Shariff (eds), Legal strategies: how corporations use law to improve performance. Springer , pp. 247-265. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02135-0_11

    Corporate risk management and legal strategy. / Belcher, Alice.

    Legal strategies: how corporations use law to improve performance. ed. / Antoine Masson; Mary J. Shariff. Springer , 2009. p. 247-265.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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    Belcher A. Corporate risk management and legal strategy. In Masson A, Shariff MJ, editors, Legal strategies: how corporations use law to improve performance. Springer . 2009. p. 247-265 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02135-0_11