Correlations Between Clinical Trial Outcomes Based on Symptoms, Functional Impairments, and Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents With ADHD

David R. Coghill (Lead / Corresponding author), Alain Joseph, Vanja Sikirica, Mark Kosinski, Caleb Bliss, Michael Huss

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)
    204 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Objective: To assess relationships between treatment-associated changes in measures of ADHD symptoms, functional impairments, and health-related quality of life in children and adolescents with ADHD.

    Method: Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated post hoc for changes from baseline to endpoint in outcomes of one randomized, placebo- and active-controlled trial of lisdexamfetamine (osmotic-release methylphenidate reference) and one of guanfacine extended-release (atomoxetine reference).

    Results: Changes in ADHD Rating Scale IV (ADHD-RS-IV) total score generally correlated moderately with changes in Child Health and Illness Profile-Child Edition: Parent Report Form (CHIP-CE:PRF) Achievement and Risk Avoidance ( r ≈ .4), but weakly with Resilience, Satisfaction, and Comfort ( r ≈ .2); and moderately with Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale-Parent (WFIRS-P) total score ( r ≈ .5). CHIP-CE: PRF Achievement and Risk Avoidance correlated moderately to strongly with WFIRS-P total score ( r ≈ .6).

    Conclusion: The ADHD-RS-IV, CHIP-CE:PRF, and WFIRS-P capture distinct but interconnected aspects of treatment response in individuals with ADHD.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-14
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Aug 2017

    Keywords

    • ADHD
    • CHIP-CE
    • HRQoL
    • Functional impairment
    • Pharmacological treatment

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Correlations Between Clinical Trial Outcomes Based on Symptoms, Functional Impairments, and Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents With ADHD'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this